AmericanCatholic.org
 
Skip Navigation Links
Home
Catholic News
Saints
Seasonal
Special Reports
Movies
Shopping
Donate
Share:
Facebook
Twitter
Google Plus
LinkedIn
Email
RSS Feeds
ON FAITH & MEDIA View Comments

A Perfect Getaway

By
John Mulderig
Source: Catholic News Service

The natural splendors of a remote area of Hawaii provide the backdrop for director David Twohy's not-so-splendid thriller "A Perfect Getaway" (Rogue). After a reasonably intriguing central plot twist—though one that fails to jibe entirely with what has gone before—the shifty drama degenerates, becoming overwrought in tone and excessively violent in content.
 
As they head for the beautiful, but isolated Kalalau Valley on the island of Kauai, hiking honeymooners Cliff (Steve Zahn) and Cydney (Milla Jovovich) learn that the couple wanted in a series of recent, well-publicized murders may have fled to the region. So when Kale (Chris Hemsworth) and Cleo (Marley Shelton), a pair of creepy hitchhikers they had refused to pick up earlier, suspiciously and threateningly resurface, the newlyweds are unnerved.
 
Pressing on, they cross paths with friendly, talkative Iraq War veteran Nick (Timothy Olyphant), whose company they initially find reassuring. But his trail leads to girlfriend Gina (Kiele Sanchez), and it's not long before his tall tales of combat prowess and her dexterity with a butcher knife—exhibited to gruesome effect on a goat Nick has felled with a bow and arrow—have Cliff and Cydney worrying again.
 
Zahn's skillful impersonation of twitchy, nerdy Cliff, a Hollywood screenwriter easily overshadowed and intimidated by Nick's real-life exploits, heightens the atmosphere of uncertainty. But objectionable elements include not only the climactic bloodletting, but a prolonged skinny-dipping scene and a murky tide of four-letter words.
 
The film contains considerable action violence, some of it gory, cohabitation, drug use, rear and partial nudity, a half-dozen uses of profanity, and much rough and crude language. The USCCB Office for Film & Broadcasting classification is L—limited adult audience, films whose problematic content many adults would find troubling. The Motion Picture Association of America rating is R—restricted. Under 17 requires accompanying parent or adult guardian.
 
- - -
 
Mulderig is on the staff of the Office for Film & Broadcasting of the U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops.


Search reviews at CatholicMovieReviews.org


Thank you for your comments. Editors will review all posts before they are visible on the website.

blog comments powered by Disqus







Martha: Martha, Mary and their brother Lazarus were evidently close friends of Jesus. He came to their home simply as a welcomed guest, rather than as one celebrating the conversion of a sinner like Zacchaeus or one unceremoniously received by a suspicious Pharisee. The sisters feel free to call on Jesus at their brother’s death, even though a return to Judea at that time seems almost certain death. 
<p>No doubt Martha was an active sort of person. On one occasion (see Luke 10:38-42) she prepares the meal for Jesus and possibly his fellow guests and forthrightly states the obvious: All hands should pitch in to help with the dinner. </p><p>Yet, as biblical scholar Father John McKenzie points out, she need not be rated as an “unrecollected activist.” The evangelist is emphasizing what our Lord said on several occasions about the primacy of the spiritual: “...[D]o not worry about your life, what you will eat [or drink], or about your body, what you will wear…. But seek first the kingdom [of God] and his righteousness” (Matthew 6:25b, 33a); “One does not live by bread alone” (Luke 4:4b); “Blessed are they who hunger and thirst for righteousness…” (Matthew 5:6a). </p><p>Martha’s great glory is her simple and strong statement of faith in Jesus after her brother’s death. “Jesus told her, ‘I am the resurrection and the life; whoever believes in me, even if he dies, will live, and everyone who lives and believes in me will never die. Do you believe this?’ She said to him, ‘Yes, Lord. I have come to believe that you are the Messiah, the Son of God, the one who is coming into the world’” (John 11:25-27).</p> American Catholic Blog The commandments are a gift, not a curse. Sin is less about breaking the rules and more about breaking the Father’s heart.

 
PICKS OF THE WEEK
New from Servant Books!
Follow Jesus with the same kind of zeal that Paul had, guided by Mark Hart and Christopher Cuddy!
Wisdom for Women

Learn how the life and teachings of St. Teresa Benedicta of the Cross (Edith Stein) serve as a guide for women’s unique vocations today.

A Wild Ride

Enter the world of medieval England in this account of a rare and courageous woman, Margery Kempe, now a saint of the Anglican church.

The Wisdom of Merton
This book distills wisdom from Merton's books and journals on enduring themes which are relevant to readers today.
A Spiritual Banquet!
Whether you are new to cooking, highly experienced, or just enjoy good food, Table of Plenty invites you into experiencing meals as a sacred time.

 
CATHOLIC GREETINGS
Love
Love is a daily miracle, just like our heartbeat.
Birthday
Subscribers to Catholic Greetings Premium Service can create a personal calendar to remind them of important birthdays.
Mary's Flower - Fuchsia
Mary, nourish my love for you and for Jesus.
Sts. Ann and Joachim
Use this Catholic Greetings e-card to tell your grandparents what they mean to you.
Mary's Flower - Fuchsia
Mary, nourish my love for you and for Jesus.



Come find us at: Facebook | St. Anthony Messenger magazine Twitter | American Catholic YouTube | American Catholic