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ON FAITH & MEDIA View Comments

A Perfect Getaway

By
John Mulderig
Source: Catholic News Service

The natural splendors of a remote area of Hawaii provide the backdrop for director David Twohy's not-so-splendid thriller "A Perfect Getaway" (Rogue). After a reasonably intriguing central plot twist—though one that fails to jibe entirely with what has gone before—the shifty drama degenerates, becoming overwrought in tone and excessively violent in content.
 
As they head for the beautiful, but isolated Kalalau Valley on the island of Kauai, hiking honeymooners Cliff (Steve Zahn) and Cydney (Milla Jovovich) learn that the couple wanted in a series of recent, well-publicized murders may have fled to the region. So when Kale (Chris Hemsworth) and Cleo (Marley Shelton), a pair of creepy hitchhikers they had refused to pick up earlier, suspiciously and threateningly resurface, the newlyweds are unnerved.
 
Pressing on, they cross paths with friendly, talkative Iraq War veteran Nick (Timothy Olyphant), whose company they initially find reassuring. But his trail leads to girlfriend Gina (Kiele Sanchez), and it's not long before his tall tales of combat prowess and her dexterity with a butcher knife—exhibited to gruesome effect on a goat Nick has felled with a bow and arrow—have Cliff and Cydney worrying again.
 
Zahn's skillful impersonation of twitchy, nerdy Cliff, a Hollywood screenwriter easily overshadowed and intimidated by Nick's real-life exploits, heightens the atmosphere of uncertainty. But objectionable elements include not only the climactic bloodletting, but a prolonged skinny-dipping scene and a murky tide of four-letter words.
 
The film contains considerable action violence, some of it gory, cohabitation, drug use, rear and partial nudity, a half-dozen uses of profanity, and much rough and crude language. The USCCB Office for Film & Broadcasting classification is L—limited adult audience, films whose problematic content many adults would find troubling. The Motion Picture Association of America rating is R—restricted. Under 17 requires accompanying parent or adult guardian.
 
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Mulderig is on the staff of the Office for Film & Broadcasting of the U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops.


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Benedict Joseph Labre: Benedict Joseph Labre was truly eccentric, one of God's special little ones. Born in France and the eldest of 18 children, he studied under his uncle, a parish priest. Because of poor health and a lack of suitable academic preparation he was unsuccessful in his attempts to enter the religious life. Then, at 16 years of age, a profound change took place. Benedict lost his desire to study and gave up all thoughts of the priesthood, much to the consternation of his relatives. 
<p>He became a pilgrim, traveling from one great shrine to another, living off alms. He wore the rags of a beggar and shared his food with the poor. Filled with the love of God and neighbor, Benedict had special devotion to the Blessed Mother and to the Blessed Sacrament. In Rome, where he lived in the Colosseum for a time, he was called "the poor man of the Forty Hours Devotion" and "the beggar of Rome." The people accepted his ragged appearance better than he did. His excuse to himself was that "our comfort is not in this world." </p><p>On the last day of his life, April 16, 1783, Benedict Joseph dragged himself to a church in Rome and prayed there for two hours before he collapsed, dying peacefully in a nearby house. Immediately after his death the people proclaimed him a saint. </p><p>He was officially proclaimed a saint by Pope Leo XIII at canonization ceremonies in 1883.</p> American Catholic Blog Today offers limitless possibilities for holiness. Lean into His grace. The only thing keeping us from sainthood is ourselves.

 
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