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ON FAITH & MEDIA View Comments

Friday the 13th

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Source: Catholic News Service

Searching for his missing sister (Amanda Righetti), who disappeared after trespassing on the turf of masked maniac Jason Voorhees (Derek Mears), a young man (Jared Padalecki) becomes one of the slasher's many targets himself, along with the college student (Danielle Panabaker) who's helping him hunt. Director Marcus Nispel's gruesome revival follows the franchise's usual crass recipe: a melange of sadistic murder, casual teen sexuality, gratuitous nudity and a dash of drug use. Frequent gory violence, torture, graphic nonmarital sexual activity, upper female and rear nudity, brief pornographic imagery, marijuana use, pervasive rough and crude language, half a dozen uses of profanity, and sexual humor and references. The USCCB Office for Film & Broadcasting classification is O—morally offensive. The Motion Picture Association of America rating is R—restricted; under 17 requires accompanying parent or adult guardian.



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Oliver Plunkett: The name of today's saint is especially familiar to the Irish and the English—and with good reason. The English martyred Oliver Plunkett for defending the faith in his native Ireland during a period of severe persecution. 
<p>Born in County Meath in 1629, he studied for the priesthood in Rome and was ordained there in 1654. After some years of teaching and service to the poor of Rome he was appointed Archbishop of Armagh in Ireland. Four years later, in 1673, a new wave of anti-Catholic persecution began, forcing Archbishop Plunkett to do his pastoral work in secrecy and disguise and to live in hiding. Meanwhile, many of his priests were sent into exile; schools were closed; Church services had to be held in secret and convents and seminaries were suppressed. As archbishop, he was viewed as ultimately responsible for any rebellion or political activity among his parishioners. 
</p><p>Archbishop Plunkett was arrested and imprisoned in Dublin Castle in 1679, but his trial was moved to London. After deliberating for 15 minutes, a jury found him guilty of fomenting revolt. He was hanged, drawn and quartered in July 1681. 
</p><p>Pope Paul VI canonized Oliver Plunkett in 1975.</p> American Catholic Blog Evil will always exist, and it will enter our lives unexpectedly and without consent. But how deeply that darkness will touch us is up to us; our will is our own. The dark affects our bodies but not necessarily our souls. Our lives can be taken. But they can also be given.

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