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ON FAITH & MEDIA View Comments

Last Legion, The

By

Source: Catholic News Service

Charming but ultimately dull sword and sandals adventure, based on the novel by Valero Manfredi, about the ancient Roman roots of King Arthur. Director Doug Lefler and screenwriters Jez Butterworth and Tom Butterworth spin a fictional epic about young Romulus Augustus, who fortunately finds the sword of Julius Caesar, named Excaliburum, and even more fortunately heads to Britain. Violence merely confined to bloodless swordfights. The USCCB Office for Film & Broadcasting classification is A-II -- adults and adolescents. The Motion Picture Association of America rating is PG-13 -- parents strongly cautioned. Some material may be inappropriate for children under 13.

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Pope Urban V: In 1362, the man elected pope declined the office. When the cardinals could not find another person among them for that important office, they turned to a relative stranger: the holy person we honor today. 
<p>The new Pope Urban V proved a wise choice. A Benedictine monk and canon lawyer, he was deeply spiritual and brilliant. He lived simply and modestly, which did not always earn him friends among clergymen who had become used to comfort and privilege. Still, he pressed for reform and saw to the restoration of churches and monasteries. Except for a brief period he spent most of his eight years as pope living away from Rome at Avignon, seat of the papacy from 1309 until shortly after his death.
</p><p>He came close but was not able to achieve one of his biggest goals—reuniting the Eastern and Western churches.
</p><p>As pope, Urban continued to follow the Benedictine Rule. Shortly before his death in 1370 he asked to be moved from the papal palace to the nearby home of his brother so he could say goodbye to the ordinary people he had so often helped.</p> American Catholic Blog Jesus does not demand great actions from us but simply surrender and gratitude.

 
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