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ON FAITH & MEDIA View Comments

Delta Farce

By

Source: Catholic News Service

Stale, flat attempt at a military comedy starring Daniel Whitney in his guise of Larry the Cable Guy, supported by "Blue Collar TV" co-star Bill Engvall and the twitchy D.J. Qualls, playing amiable dumb-guy Army reservists called up to Fallujah, Iraq, but landing instead in a remote Mexican village, where they take on local bandits. Director D.B. Harding, evidently assuming a short attention span for the audience, chops the comedic scenes into annoyingly tiny bits, but is more successful turning Larry into a good-hearted, Southern-fried teddy bear. Some crude language, sexual innuendo, gay characters, a scatological sight gag and some ethnic slurs. The USCCB Office for Film & Broadcasting classification is A-III -- adults. The Motion Picture Association of America rating is PG-13 -- parents strongly cautioned. Some material may be inappropriate for children under 13. | Search Screen | Results Screen | Previous | Next | First Hit Word | This document, ranked number 6 in the hitlist, was retrieved from the NEWS database. -------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Download File MOVIE REVIEW May-14-2007 (560 words) With photo. xxxm Delta Farce By Kurt Jensen Catholic News Service NEW YORK (CNS) -- "Delta Farce" (Lionsgate) is a stale, flat attempt at a military comedy, with the unusual twist being that Daniel Whitney, in his guise of amiable redneck Larry the Cable Guy, gets most of the straight lines. Support comes from feckless Army Reserve buddies Bill (Bill Engvall of "Blue Collar TV") and Everett (the twitchy D.J. Qualls). Called up to active duty to serve in Fallujah, Iraq, they and their Humvee are instead conveniently dumped out of their transport plane near a remote Mexican town, where, thinking for about half the movie that they're in an Iraqi village, they take on a group of local bandits headed by Carlos Santana (Danny Alejo). Dumb misfits who eventually carry the day have been the staple of military comedies since World War I, but director D.B. Harding, faced with the unpleasant challenge of a comedy about the Iraq War, and evidently assuming a short attention span by the audience, has chopped his film into annoyingly brief sequences. The character of Santana, while free of the usual stereotypes of a Mexican villain, undercuts the comedy by delivering wry lectures on political correctness that might have seemed funnier on the page. There are no comedic payoffs, only scattershot one-liners and dog-eared sight gags. The screenplay by Bear Aderhold and Thomas F.X. Sullivan, is more successful in turning Larry into a Southern-fried teddy bear, if not a romantic lead. The single indication of the sly satire this film might have become is a scene in which the three dimwitted soldiers reason that in keeping the town -- which they now know to be in Mexico, not Iraq -- free of bandits meets the U.S. government's definition of combating the war on terror. The

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Augustine of Hippo: A Christian at 33, a priest at 36, a bishop at 41: Many people are familiar with the biographical sketch of Augustine of Hippo, sinner turned saint. But really to get to know the man is a rewarding experience. 
<p>There quickly surfaces the intensity with which he lived his life, whether his path led away from or toward God. The tears of his mother (August 27), the instructions of Ambrose (December 7) and, most of all, God himself speaking to him in the Scriptures redirected Augustine’s love of life to a life of love. </p><p>Having been so deeply immersed in creature-pride of life in his early days and having drunk deeply of its bitter dregs, it is not surprising that Augustine should have turned, with a holy fierceness, against the many demon-thrusts rampant in his day. His times were truly decadent—politically, socially, morally. He was both feared and loved, like the Master. The perennial criticism leveled against him: a fundamental rigorism. </p><p>In his day, he providentially fulfilled the office of prophet. Like Jeremiah and other greats, he was hard-pressed but could not keep quiet. “I say to myself, I will not mention him,/I will speak in his name no more./But then it becomes like fire burning in my heart,/imprisoned in my bones;/I grow weary holding it in,/I cannot endure it” (Jeremiah 20:9).</p> American Catholic Blog Silence is the ability to trust that God is acting, teaching, and using me—even before I perform or after my seeming failures. Silence is the necessary space around things that allows them to develop and flourish without my pushing. God takes it from there.

 
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