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ON FAITH & MEDIA View Comments

Delta Farce

By

Source: Catholic News Service

Stale, flat attempt at a military comedy starring Daniel Whitney in his guise of Larry the Cable Guy, supported by "Blue Collar TV" co-star Bill Engvall and the twitchy D.J. Qualls, playing amiable dumb-guy Army reservists called up to Fallujah, Iraq, but landing instead in a remote Mexican village, where they take on local bandits. Director D.B. Harding, evidently assuming a short attention span for the audience, chops the comedic scenes into annoyingly tiny bits, but is more successful turning Larry into a good-hearted, Southern-fried teddy bear. Some crude language, sexual innuendo, gay characters, a scatological sight gag and some ethnic slurs. The USCCB Office for Film & Broadcasting classification is A-III -- adults. The Motion Picture Association of America rating is PG-13 -- parents strongly cautioned. Some material may be inappropriate for children under 13. | Search Screen | Results Screen | Previous | Next | First Hit Word | This document, ranked number 6 in the hitlist, was retrieved from the NEWS database. -------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Download File MOVIE REVIEW May-14-2007 (560 words) With photo. xxxm Delta Farce By Kurt Jensen Catholic News Service NEW YORK (CNS) -- "Delta Farce" (Lionsgate) is a stale, flat attempt at a military comedy, with the unusual twist being that Daniel Whitney, in his guise of amiable redneck Larry the Cable Guy, gets most of the straight lines. Support comes from feckless Army Reserve buddies Bill (Bill Engvall of "Blue Collar TV") and Everett (the twitchy D.J. Qualls). Called up to active duty to serve in Fallujah, Iraq, they and their Humvee are instead conveniently dumped out of their transport plane near a remote Mexican town, where, thinking for about half the movie that they're in an Iraqi village, they take on a group of local bandits headed by Carlos Santana (Danny Alejo). Dumb misfits who eventually carry the day have been the staple of military comedies since World War I, but director D.B. Harding, faced with the unpleasant challenge of a comedy about the Iraq War, and evidently assuming a short attention span by the audience, has chopped his film into annoyingly brief sequences. The character of Santana, while free of the usual stereotypes of a Mexican villain, undercuts the comedy by delivering wry lectures on political correctness that might have seemed funnier on the page. There are no comedic payoffs, only scattershot one-liners and dog-eared sight gags. The screenplay by Bear Aderhold and Thomas F.X. Sullivan, is more successful in turning Larry into a Southern-fried teddy bear, if not a romantic lead. The single indication of the sly satire this film might have become is a scene in which the three dimwitted soldiers reason that in keeping the town -- which they now know to be in Mexico, not Iraq -- free of bandits meets the U.S. government's definition of combating the war on terror. The



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Joseph of Arimathea and Nicodemus: The actions of these two influential Jewish leaders give insight into the charismatic power of Jesus and his teachings—and the risks that could be involved in following him.
<p><b>Joseph</b> was a respected, wealthy civic leader who had become a disciple of Jesus. Following the death of Jesus, Joseph obtained Jesus' body from Pilate, wrapped it in fine linen and buried it. For these reasons Joseph is considered the patron saint of funeral directors and pallbearers. More important is the courage Joseph showed in asking Pilate for Jesus' body. Jesus was a condemned criminal who had been publicly executed. According to some legends, Joseph was punished and imprisoned for such a bold act.
</p><p><b>Nicodemus</b> was a Pharisee and, like Joseph, an important first-century Jew. We know from John's Gospel that Nicodemus went to Jesus at night—secretly—to better understand his teachings about the kingdom. Later, Nicodemus spoke up for Jesus at the time of his arrest and assisted in Jesus' burial. We know little else about Nicodemus.
</p><p></p> American Catholic Blog Together with baptism, the other sacraments of initiation are Eucharist and confirmation. This trifecta makes us full members of the Church, like older children who can thoughtfully participate in all the elements of family life. But more than just milestones of belonging, these sacraments change our souls.

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