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ON FAITH & MEDIA View Comments

Delta Farce

By

Source: Catholic News Service

Stale, flat attempt at a military comedy starring Daniel Whitney in his guise of Larry the Cable Guy, supported by "Blue Collar TV" co-star Bill Engvall and the twitchy D.J. Qualls, playing amiable dumb-guy Army reservists called up to Fallujah, Iraq, but landing instead in a remote Mexican village, where they take on local bandits. Director D.B. Harding, evidently assuming a short attention span for the audience, chops the comedic scenes into annoyingly tiny bits, but is more successful turning Larry into a good-hearted, Southern-fried teddy bear. Some crude language, sexual innuendo, gay characters, a scatological sight gag and some ethnic slurs. The USCCB Office for Film & Broadcasting classification is A-III -- adults. The Motion Picture Association of America rating is PG-13 -- parents strongly cautioned. Some material may be inappropriate for children under 13. | Search Screen | Results Screen | Previous | Next | First Hit Word | This document, ranked number 6 in the hitlist, was retrieved from the NEWS database. -------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Download File MOVIE REVIEW May-14-2007 (560 words) With photo. xxxm Delta Farce By Kurt Jensen Catholic News Service NEW YORK (CNS) -- "Delta Farce" (Lionsgate) is a stale, flat attempt at a military comedy, with the unusual twist being that Daniel Whitney, in his guise of amiable redneck Larry the Cable Guy, gets most of the straight lines. Support comes from feckless Army Reserve buddies Bill (Bill Engvall of "Blue Collar TV") and Everett (the twitchy D.J. Qualls). Called up to active duty to serve in Fallujah, Iraq, they and their Humvee are instead conveniently dumped out of their transport plane near a remote Mexican town, where, thinking for about half the movie that they're in an Iraqi village, they take on a group of local bandits headed by Carlos Santana (Danny Alejo). Dumb misfits who eventually carry the day have been the staple of military comedies since World War I, but director D.B. Harding, faced with the unpleasant challenge of a comedy about the Iraq War, and evidently assuming a short attention span by the audience, has chopped his film into annoyingly brief sequences. The character of Santana, while free of the usual stereotypes of a Mexican villain, undercuts the comedy by delivering wry lectures on political correctness that might have seemed funnier on the page. There are no comedic payoffs, only scattershot one-liners and dog-eared sight gags. The screenplay by Bear Aderhold and Thomas F.X. Sullivan, is more successful in turning Larry into a Southern-fried teddy bear, if not a romantic lead. The single indication of the sly satire this film might have become is a scene in which the three dimwitted soldiers reason that in keeping the town -- which they now know to be in Mexico, not Iraq -- free of bandits meets the U.S. government's definition of combating the war on terror. The



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Joachim and Anne: In the Scriptures, Matthew and Luke furnish a legal family history of Jesus, tracing ancestry to show that Jesus is the culmination of great promises. Not only is his mother’s family neglected, we also know nothing factual about them except that they existed. Even the names <i>Joachim</i> and <i>Anne</i> come from a legendary source written more than a century after Jesus died. 
<p>The heroism and holiness of these people, however, is inferred from the whole family atmosphere around Mary in the Scriptures. Whether we rely on the legends about Mary’s childhood or make guesses from the information in the Bible, we see in her a fulfillment of many generations of prayerful persons, herself steeped in the religious traditions of her people. </p><p>The strong character of Mary in making decisions, her continuous practice of prayer, her devotion to the laws of her faith, her steadiness at moments of crisis, and her devotion to her relatives—all indicate a close-knit, loving family that looked forward to the next generation even while retaining the best of the past. </p><p>Joachim and Anne—whether these are their real names or not—represent that entire quiet series of generations who faithfully perform their duties, practice their faith and establish an atmosphere for the coming of the Messiah, but remain obscure.</p> American Catholic Blog My hope is that my children reach beyond me in character. I don’t want to be their moral ceiling. That makes me responsible to guide and discipline them in directions I don’t always follow. And above all, to show them mercy for their human frailty, as I ask them to show me that same mercy for mine.

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