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ON FAITH & MEDIA View Comments

Nine Lives

By

Source: Catholic News Service

Finely acted nine-part anthology with a central female character in each segment: prison inmate Sandra (Elpidia Carrillo); pregnant Diana (Robin Wright Penn) reconnecting with her old flame in the supermarket; powder keg Holly (Lisa Gay Hamilton) seething with serious stepfather issues; Sonia (Holly Hunter), with a troubled relationship below the surface; teenage Samantha (Amanda Seyfried), caught between sparring parents; Lorna (Amy Brenneman), meeting her ex-husband at his wife's funeral; married Ruth (Sissy Spacek), checking into a motel with her would-be lover; Camille (Kathy Baker), facing a mastectomy; and Maggie (Glenn Close) and daughter Maria (Dakota Fanning) visiting a grave. Writer-director Rodrigo Garcia has fashioned a thoughtful -- often sad -- reflection on mankind's interconnection, with extraordinarily natural-sounding dialogue, which together with the performances, surmount some slow patches. Profanity and rough language, premarital sex, some sexual talk and a nongraphic sexual encounter, attempted suicide and murder, and an abortion discussion. The USCCB Office for Film & Broadcasting classification is L -- limited adult audience, films whose problematic content many adults would find troubling. The Motion Picture Association of America rating is R -- restricted.

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Marian and James: Often, it’s hard to find much detail from the lives of saints of the early Church. What we know about the third-century martyrs we honor today is likewise minimal. But we do know that they lived and died for the faith. Almost 2,000 years later, that is enough reason to honor them. 
<p>Born in North Africa, Marian was a lector or reader; James was a deacon. For their devotion to the faith they suffered during the persecution of Valerian. </p><p>Prior to their persecution, Marian and James were visited by two bishops who encouraged them in the faith not long before they themselves were martyred. A short time later, Marian and James were arrested and interrogated. The two readily confessed their faith and, for that, were tortured. While in prison they are said to have experienced visions, including one of the two bishops who had visited them earlier. </p><p>On the last day of their lives, Marian and James joined other Christians facing martyrdom. They were blindfolded and then put to death. Their bodies were thrown into the water. The year was 259.</p> American Catholic Blog As we befriend those who are paralyzed by fear, illness, failure, or loss, we are loving them as Christ would. We are building holy and beautiful relationships with the people God has entrusted to our care. Our mission, if we choose to accept it, is to carry our friends to Jesus.

Spiritual Resilience

 
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