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ON FAITH & MEDIA View Comments

Where the Truth Lies

By

Source: Catholic News Service

Stylish but unnecessarily salacious retronoir murder mystery based on the novel by Rupert Holmes. A young celebrity journalist (Alison Lohman), in researching a tell-all book on a Martin and Lewis-like comedy team (Colin Firth and Kevin Bacon), attempts to uncover the real story behind their breakup 15 years earlier and the true circumstances surrounding the death of a female fan (Rachel Blanchard) whose body was found in their hotel suite, the scandalous fallout of which tainted their showbiz careers and ruptured their friendship. Despite outstanding performances by Firth and Bacon, artful production design and a sensuous score, director Atom Egoyan's film makes pretensions about the nature of truth and celebrity, but is essentially a glossy whodunit wrapped up in nostalgia and glamour and spiced with soft-core sleaze and gratuitous nudity for titillating effect, and in the end doesn't even deliver much suspense. Several strong sex scenes, including an orgy, a lesbian encounter and a menage a trois, full-frontal nudity, homoerotic themes, a suicide, drug content, a brutal beating, and sporadic rough and crude language. The USCCB Office for Film & Broadcasting classification is O -- morally offensive. Not rated by the Motion Picture Association of America.

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Jerome Emiliani: A careless and irreligious soldier for the city-state of Venice, Jerome was captured in a skirmish at an outpost town and chained in a dungeon. In prison Jerome had a lot of time to think, and he gradually learned how to pray. When he escaped, he returned to Venice where he took charge of the education of his nephews—and began his own studies for the priesthood. 
<p>In the years after his ordination, events again called Jerome to a decision and a new lifestyle. Plague and famine swept northern Italy. Jerome began caring for the sick and feeding the hungry at his own expense. While serving the sick and the poor, he soon resolved to devote himself and his property solely to others, particularly to abandoned children. He founded three orphanages, a shelter for penitent prostitutes and a hospital. </p><p>Around 1532 Jerome and two other priests established a congregation, the Clerks Regular of Somasca, dedicated to the care of orphans and the education of youth. Jerome died in 1537 from a disease he caught while tending the sick. He was canonized in 1767. In 1928 Pius Xl named him the patron of orphans and abandoned children.</p> American Catholic Blog Jesus really cannot be merely a part of our life; he must be the center of our life. Unless we preserve some quiet time each day to sit at his feet, our action will become distraction, and we’ll be unhappy.

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