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ON FAITH & MEDIA View Comments

Turtles Can Fly

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Source: Catholic News Service

Quietly powerful drama set in Kurdistan on the eve of the U.S. invasion of Iraq, which follows the shattered lives of three orphaned children: a hustling street urchin (Soran Ebrahim) who runs a business installing satellite dishes and clearing fields of land mines, an armless boy (Hirsh Feyssal) who may be clairvoyant, and his sad-eyed sister (a haunting Avaz Latif), traumatized by an unspeakable crime which robbed her of her innocence and will to live. Putting a human face on "collateral damage," director Bahman Ghobadi elicits strong performances from his three nonprofessional leads, and the film, shot entirely in a refugee camp on the Turkish-Iraqi border, serves as a grim but compelling meditation on the obscenity of war, told through the eyes of its most vulnerable victims. Subtitles. War violence, an implied rape of a minor, a murder of a child (with extenuating circumstances), a suicide, and recurring disturbing images of maimed children. The USCCB Office for Film & Broadcasting classification is L -- limited adult audience, films whose problematic content many adults would find troubling. Not rated by the Motion Picture Association of America.



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Sharbel Makhluf: Although this saint never traveled far from the Lebanese village of Beka-Kafra, where he was born, his influence has spread widely. 
<p>Joseph Zaroun Makluf was raised by an uncle because his father, a mule driver, died when Joseph was only three. At the age of 23, Joseph joined the Monastery of St. Maron at Annaya, Lebanon, and took the name Sharbel in honor of a second-century martyr. He professed his final vows in 1853 and was ordained six years later. </p><p>Following the example of the fifth-century St. Maron, Sharbel lived as a hermit from 1875 until his death. His reputation for holiness prompted people to seek him to receive a blessing and to be remembered in his prayers. He followed a strict fast and was very devoted to the Blessed Sacrament. When his superiors occasionally asked him to administer the sacraments to nearby villages, Sharbel did so gladly. </p><p>He died in the late afternoon on Christmas Eve. Christians and non-Christians soon made his tomb a place of pilgrimage and of cures. Pope Paul VI beatified him in 1965 and canonized him 12 years later.</p> American Catholic Blog Bluntly put, children are amateur and immature observers. In the short term, they aren’t always attracted to even the best of examples. Only as they move beyond childhood do they come to fully appreciate and emulate their parents’ ways. Much of good parenting doesn’t make its mark until years later.

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