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ON FAITH & MEDIA View Comments

Catch a Fire

By

Source: Catholic News Service

Intelligent if unevenly compelling drama set in apartheid-era South Africa that tells the real-life story of Patrick Chamusso (Derek Luke), a husband and father who abandons his apolitical stance and becomes a militant rebel fighter after he and his wife (Bonnie Henna) are wrongfully arrested and tortured by white police investigators (headed by Tim Robbins) in connection with an explosion at the oil refinery where he works. Despite all the right ingredients -- a solid cast, a worthy story, taut pacing and an accomplished director in Phillip Noyce -- the tale never ignites from an emotional standpoint. However, in exploring themes of racism and the timely issue of using violence as a means of political protest, the film ultimately advocates forgiveness as imperative in healing the wounds caused by hatred. Some violence, images of torture, an instance of rough language and a few crude expressions and racial slurs. The USCCB Office for Film & Broadcasting classification is A-III -- adults. The Motion Picture Association of America rating is PG-13 -- parents strongly cautioned. Some material may be inappropriate for children under 13.

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Jerome Emiliani: A careless and irreligious soldier for the city-state of Venice, Jerome was captured in a skirmish at an outpost town and chained in a dungeon. In prison Jerome had a lot of time to think, and he gradually learned how to pray. When he escaped, he returned to Venice where he took charge of the education of his nephews—and began his own studies for the priesthood. 
<p>In the years after his ordination, events again called Jerome to a decision and a new lifestyle. Plague and famine swept northern Italy. Jerome began caring for the sick and feeding the hungry at his own expense. While serving the sick and the poor, he soon resolved to devote himself and his property solely to others, particularly to abandoned children. He founded three orphanages, a shelter for penitent prostitutes and a hospital. </p><p>Around 1532 Jerome and two other priests established a congregation, the Clerks Regular of Somasca, dedicated to the care of orphans and the education of youth. Jerome died in 1537 from a disease he caught while tending the sick. He was canonized in 1767. In 1928 Pius Xl named him the patron of orphans and abandoned children.</p> American Catholic Blog Jesus really cannot be merely a part of our life; he must be the center of our life. Unless we preserve some quiet time each day to sit at his feet, our action will become distraction, and we’ll be unhappy.

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