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High Tension

By

Source: Catholic News Service

Gratuitously violent horror film set in rural France about two friends (Cecile de France and Maiwenn Le Besco) whose idyllic weekend studying for exams at a secluded farmhouse becomes a struggle for survival when they are terrorized by a sadistic killer (Philippe Nahon). Directed by Alexandre Aja, this poorly dubbed homage to American slasher flicks is, despite moments of suspense, little more than a stylishly executed but repellent exercise in bloody excess, full of stomach-churning gore and capped by an illogical plot twist. Mostly in French with English subtitles. The film contains excessive graphic violence, including decapitations, dismemberment, a bludgeoning and an impaling, a homoerotic theme, perverse sexual situations including necrophilia, a scene of masturbation, a voyeuristic shower sequence with frontal nudity, as well as rough and crude language. The USCCB Office for Film & Broadcasting classification is O -- morally offensive. The Motion Picture Association of America rating is R -- restricted.

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Leopold Mandic: Western Christians who are working for greater dialogue with Orthodox Christians may be reaping the fruits of Father Leopold’s prayers.
<p>A native of Croatia, Leopold joined the Capuchin Franciscans and was ordained several years later in spite of several health problems. He could not speak loudly enough to preach publicly. For many years he also suffered from severe arthritis, poor eyesight and a stomach ailment.
</p><p>Leopold taught patrology, the study of the Church Fathers, to the clerics of his province for several years, but he is best known for his work in the confessional, where he sometimes spent 13-15 hours a day. Several bishops sought out his spiritual advice.
</p><p>Leopold’s dream was to go to the Orthodox Christians and work for the reunion of Roman Catholicism and Orthodoxy. His health never permitted it. Leopold often renewed his vow to go to the Eastern Christians; the cause of unity was constantly in his prayers.
</p><p>At a time when Pope Pius XII said that the greatest sin of our time is "to have lost all sense of sin," Leopold had a profound sense of sin and an even firmer sense of God’s grace awaiting human cooperation.
</p><p>Leopold, who lived most of his life in Padua, died on July 30, 1942, and was canonized in 1982.</p> American Catholic Blog Heavenly Father, give me the grace to be grateful and to use my gifts and talents to show your love to others so that when they see me, they recognize you living in me and loving them through me. I ask this in Jesus's name, Amen.

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