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ON FAITH & MEDIA View Comments

P.S. I Love You

By

Source: Catholic News Service

Uneven but ultimately touching and well-acted love story about a woman (Hilary Swank) who loses her Irish husband (Gerard Butler) to a brain tumor, but is guided through the stages of grief by letters he wrote for her before he died, and arranged to have periodically delivered. Writer-director Richard LaGravenese's film seems contrived at first, but slowly builds in interest as its heroine goes through her healing journey, helped by her girlfriends (Lisa Kudrow and Gina Gershon) and two men who take a romantic interest in her (Harry Connick Jr. and Jeffrey Dean Morgan). Moderate conversational expletives and crass expressions, one nonmarital and a couple of marital nongraphic bedroom scenes and casual acceptance of the former, some sexual banter and passing homosexual references, and brief rear male nudity. The USCCB Office for Film & Broadcasting classification is A-III -- adults. The Motion Picture Association of America rating is PG-13 -- parents strongly cautioned. Some material may be inappropriate for children under 13.

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Augustine of Hippo: A Christian at 33, a priest at 36, a bishop at 41: Many people are familiar with the biographical sketch of Augustine of Hippo, sinner turned saint. But really to get to know the man is a rewarding experience. 
<p>There quickly surfaces the intensity with which he lived his life, whether his path led away from or toward God. The tears of his mother (August 27), the instructions of Ambrose (December 7) and, most of all, God himself speaking to him in the Scriptures redirected Augustine’s love of life to a life of love. </p><p>Having been so deeply immersed in creature-pride of life in his early days and having drunk deeply of its bitter dregs, it is not surprising that Augustine should have turned, with a holy fierceness, against the many demon-thrusts rampant in his day. His times were truly decadent—politically, socially, morally. He was both feared and loved, like the Master. The perennial criticism leveled against him: a fundamental rigorism. </p><p>In his day, he providentially fulfilled the office of prophet. Like Jeremiah and other greats, he was hard-pressed but could not keep quiet. “I say to myself, I will not mention him,/I will speak in his name no more./But then it becomes like fire burning in my heart,/imprisoned in my bones;/I grow weary holding it in,/I cannot endure it” (Jeremiah 20:9).</p> American Catholic Blog Lord, please fill my heart and soul with the confidence that you will always provide what I need, when I need it, and let me be obedient to you.

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