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ON FAITH & MEDIA View Comments

Taking Sides

By

Source: Catholic News Service

Failed drama set in post-World War II Berlin about the prosecution of famed German symphony conductor Wilhelm Furtwangler (Stellan Skarsgard) by an American officer (Harvey Keitel). Despite lush, atmospheric settings, director Istvan Szabo's film, which is based on a true story, lacks dramatic tension as it poorly attempts to convey the difficult choice between artistic freedom and political responsibility. Horrific depictions of mass graves and some rough language, profanity and crass expressions. The USCCB Office for Film & Broadcasting classification is A-III -- adults. Not rated by the Motion Picture Association of America.

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Benedict Joseph Labre: Benedict Joseph Labre was truly eccentric, one of God's special little ones. Born in France and the eldest of 18 children, he studied under his uncle, a parish priest. Because of poor health and a lack of suitable academic preparation he was unsuccessful in his attempts to enter the religious life. Then, at 16 years of age, a profound change took place. Benedict lost his desire to study and gave up all thoughts of the priesthood, much to the consternation of his relatives. 
<p>He became a pilgrim, traveling from one great shrine to another, living off alms. He wore the rags of a beggar and shared his food with the poor. Filled with the love of God and neighbor, Benedict had special devotion to the Blessed Mother and to the Blessed Sacrament. In Rome, where he lived in the Colosseum for a time, he was called "the poor man of the Forty Hours Devotion" and "the beggar of Rome." The people accepted his ragged appearance better than he did. His excuse to himself was that "our comfort is not in this world." </p><p>On the last day of his life, April 16, 1783, Benedict Joseph dragged himself to a church in Rome and prayed there for two hours before he collapsed, dying peacefully in a nearby house. Immediately after his death the people proclaimed him a saint. </p><p>He was officially proclaimed a saint by Pope Leo XIII at canonization ceremonies in 1881.</p> American Catholic Blog Let us beg Our Lady to make our hearts as meek and humble as her Son’s. From her and within her the heart of Jesus was formed. We can learn much from Our Lady, who was so humble because she was all for God.


 
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