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St. Anthony Messenger Articles

Information for Freelance Writers

St. Anthony Messenger, published by Franciscan Media, is a monthly, general-interest, family-oriented Catholic magazine, in continuous print since 1893. Our company motto, "Live in love. Grow in faith." states well the goal of this magazine: We seek to meet our 95,000 subscribers where they are and to offer them inspiration from the heart of Catholicism—the Gospels and the experience of God's people. There is a Franciscan flavor to all that we do: faithful, sometimes challenging, always down-to-earth, infused with love and respect, always following Jesus in the life of his Church.

The best way to know what we publish is to study several recent issues of St. Anthony Messenger. Links to some typical articles are at the end of this page.

GUIDELINES FOR WRITING, PREPARING AND SUBMITTING AN ARTICLE

  1. Query in advance by e-mail. If a query is accepted, the completed article should normally be submitted within two months of acceptance.
  2. In your query, state your proposed topic, sources, authorities and your qualifications to write the article. Library research will not suffice. Fresh sources and interviews with experts or people in the field will be necessary. Seasonal material (Mother's Day, Lent, Christmas, etc.) should be submitted one year in advance.
  3. We do not publish filler material—anecdotes, jokes, thoughts to ponder. We do not publish articles in installment or serial form.
  4. We never consider articles submitted simultaneously to other magazines. We do not reprint articles from publications outside of Franciscan Media.
  5. E-mail submission is strongly preferred. E-mail all initial correspondence, queries etc. to MagazineEditors@FranciscanMedia.org, attention John Feister.
  6. Feature articles are 2,000-2,500 words. We increasingly are publishing shorter pieces as well.
  7. Popular, accessible style is essential.
  8. Please allow up to eight weeks for return or purchase of publication rights. Manuscripts are reviewed by a number of editors who sometimes travel, etc.
  9. Payment for articles and fiction is 20 cents per published word—upon acceptance and return of a signed author-publisher agreement form. We buy first worldwide serial rights to publish and republish "the work" in any and all forms or formats, including all electronic formats. Authors receive two complimentary copies of published work.

Photography

  1. Photo support is crucial for articles about a one-of-a-kind event. The content of thematic articles or essays (for example, "the importance of forgiveness") lends itself to illustration. Our art director is part of the decision to buy an article and will indicate whether photos or illustrations will be needed. For more information, contact Art Director Jeanne Kortekamp (JKortekamp@FranciscanMedia.org)
  2. If professional-quality photos already exist on a subject, please supply information on how to obtain them. Otherwise, supply contact information for the subject(s) of the article so that a professional photographer can be engaged. In some exceptional cases, nonprofessional-quality photos can be used.

Examples of articles we have published:

Church/Sacraments

The Lord's Supper: Ancient Story, New Beginning
Praying the Steps: A Good Friday Tradition
Catholic Parishes Minister to Soul and Body
Sexual Abuse and the Catholic Church: Where Are We Now?

Education/Spiritual Growth

Finding Faith in God's Creatures
Keeping Faith During Hard Economic Times
Holistic Care: Treating Mind, Body and Spirit
The Catholic Tradition of Health Care
How a Mutt Taught Me About God
St. Francis and the Millennials: Kindred Spirits
World Youth Day: Celebrating Young Faith

Family/Marriage

Christopher West on the Theology of the Body
Caregivers Need Care, Too

Profile/Celebrity/Saints

Dick Vitale: Faith, Family and Foul Shots
Martin Sheen and Emilio Estevez on The Way
Blessed John Paul II: Witness to Hope
Therese Borchard: Beyond Blue
Matthew Kelly: On Faith and Fatherhood
Jason Berry, Church Whistleblower
Sisters of Life
Blessed John Henry Newman: Lover of Truth
Pray, Hope, Love: Dr. Robert Wicks
Father Leo Patalinghug: Connecting Food and Faith
The Feast of All Saints: God's Glorious Nobodies

Scripture/Theology

Jesus' Extraordinary Treatment of Women
God's Great Reversal: Key to the Gospel of Luke
St. Paul and Women: A Mixed Record
Jesus: What's Fact? What's Fiction?
St. Peter: A Pope for All Seasons

Social Issues/Foreign

Lessons in Giving
Bringing Help and Hope to Haiti
Last Call: Grace and Sobriety
Will There Be Christians in the Holy Land?
No Greater Love: Operation Pedro Pan

Spirituality/Inspirational Stories

Pathways to God in Everyday Life
Michael Leach: Why I Stay Catholic
12 Keys to a Sacramental Marriage
Seven Things Catholics Should Know About Divorce
Fitting Prayer Into a Busy Life
Spiritually Healthy Children
Women & Spirit: Catholic Sisters in America
My Life With Multiple Sclerosis
Connecting With Creation at Yellowstone

Fiction: We do not have examples of fiction on our Web site. Consult our Writer's Guidelines about fiction and see recently published stories.

St. Anthony Messenger magazine
Franciscan Media
28 W. Liberty St.
Cincinnati, Ohio 45202





Cyril and Methodius: Because their father was an officer in a part of Greece inhabited by many Slavs, these two Greek brothers ultimately became missionaries, teachers and patrons of the Slavic peoples. 
<p>After a brilliant course of studies, Cyril (called Constantine until he became a monk shortly before his death) refused the governorship of a district such as his brother had accepted among the Slavic-speaking population. Cyril withdrew to a monastery where his brother Methodius had become a monk after some years in a governmental post. </p><p>A decisive change in their lives occurred when the Duke of Moravia (present-day Czech Republic) asked the Eastern Emperor Michael for political independence from German rule and ecclesiastical autonomy (having their own clergy and liturgy). Cyril and Methodius undertook the missionary task. </p><p>Cyril’s first work was to invent an alphabet, still used in some Eastern liturgies. His followers probably formed the Cyrillic alphabet (for example, modern Russian) from Greek capital letters. Together they translated the Gospels, the psalter, Paul’s letters and the liturgical books into Slavonic, and composed a Slavonic liturgy, highly irregular then. </p><p>That and their free use of the vernacular in preaching led to opposition from the German clergy. The bishop refused to consecrate Slavic bishops and priests, and Cyril was forced to appeal to Rome. On the visit to Rome, he and Methodius had the joy of seeing their new liturgy approved by Pope Adrian II. Cyril, long an invalid, died in Rome 50 days after taking the monastic habit. </p><p>Methodius continued mission work for 16 more years. He was papal legate for all the Slavic peoples, consecrated a bishop and then given an ancient see (now in the Czech Republic). When much of their former territory was removed from their jurisdiction, the Bavarian bishops retaliated with a violent storm of accusation against Methodius. As a result, Emperor Louis the German exiled Methodius for three years. Pope John VIII secured his release. </p><p>Because the Frankish clergy, still smarting, continued their accusations, Methodius had to go to Rome to defend himself against charges of heresy and uphold his use of the Slavonic liturgy. He was again vindicated. </p><p>Legend has it that in a feverish period of activity, Methodius translated the whole Bible into Slavonic in eight months. He died on Tuesday of Holy Week, surrounded by his disciples, in his cathedral church. </p><p>Opposition continued after his death, and the work of the brothers in Moravia was brought to an end and their disciples scattered. But the expulsions had the beneficial effect of spreading the spiritual, liturgical and cultural work of the brothers to Bulgaria, Bohemia and southern Poland. Patrons of Moravia, and specially venerated by Catholic Czechs, Slovaks, Croatians, Orthodox Serbians and Bulgarians, Cyril and Methodius are eminently fitted to guard the long-desired unity of East and West. In 1980, Pope John Paul II named them additional co-patrons of Europe (with Benedict).</p> American Catholic Blog This is the beauty of self-giving love: Men and women, driven by love, freely choose to give up their autonomy, to limit their freedom, by committing themselves to the good of the spouse. Love is so powerful that it impels them to want to surrender their will to their beloved in this profound way.

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