AmericanCatholic.org
 
Skip Navigation Links
Home
Catholic News
Saints
Seasonal
Special Reports
Movies
Shopping
Donate
Share:
Facebook
Twitter
Google Plus
LinkedIn
Email
RSS Feeds

advertisement

Advent: A Season of Surprises View Comments
By Kathy Coffey

During an Advent session at Mater Dolorosa Parish in San Francisco, one lady stoutly maintained
she hated surprises. During a raffle afterward, she won the turkey!

Such unexpected events help prepare us for Advent, the season of a surprising spirituality. God, who could have become human as a respected philosopher like Plato, a military leader like Alexander the Great or a beautiful queen like Cleopatra, comes instead as a helpless baby. All the beauty and power in the universe becomes vulnerable and dependent. Furthermore, God pitches a tent, not only among us, but in us, as some translations say. What an odd residence for the King of Kings!

As Gaudium et Spes says, God “has in a certain way united himself with each individual. He worked with human hands, he thought with a human mind. He acted with a human will and with a human heart he loved” (#22). Advent is meant as a time of preparation for that incarnation event, but how can we prepare for something so impossible to imagine?

One answer lies in the direct interplay between Scripture and our lived experience. It seems as if God always makes an entrance through the door behind us, the place where we weren’t looking. That pattern, also found in the Bible, sensitizes us to look beyond the tried-and-true, socially sanctioned, boring, repetitious rut. As some say, God lurks in the cracks between certainties.

Promise came to the Samaritan woman in a surprising way (John 4:7- 42). She trudged to the well as she had many other times, but there she met a stranger who snagged her attention. His request was preposterous: This guy, without a bucket, wasn’t supposed to use the vessel of a less orthodox Jew!
Nor was he supposed to talk with a woman in public. He didn’t make a demand, but suggested a possibility: If only you knew the gift of God.

It’s the kind of tantalizing potential children suspect before Christmas. If only you knew what was in that large box with the intriguing tag. How could the woman at the well resist such a mysterious invitation?

Until then, she’d probably done what she had to do to survive: endless drudgery, reliance on men since she had few rights, enduring the sneers of selfrighteous, married-only-once women. The stranger offers her another way, an inner source of vitality that will never dry up or disappoint. He presents God’s life in terms she understands. Who appreciates a fountain more than a desert dweller? She can practically taste fresh drops on her tongue!

1
2
3
4
5


Kathy Coffey, the author of many books such as Women of Mercy (Orbis), gives workshops and retreats nationally. She may be reached atcafekathy@aol.com.

Thank you for your comments. Editors will review all posts before they are visible on the website.

blog comments powered by Disqus



Miguel Agustín Pro: 
		<i>¡Viva Cristo Rey!</i> (Long live Christ the King) were the last words Fr. Pro uttered before he was executed for being a Catholic priest and serving his flock. 
<p>Born into a prosperous, devout family in Guadalupe de Zacatecas, Mexico, he entered the Jesuits in 1911, but three years later fled to Granada, Spain, because of religious persecution in Mexico. He was ordained in Belgium in 1925. </p><p>Fr. Pro immediately returned to Mexico, where he served a Church forced to go “underground.” He celebrated the Eucharist clandestinely and ministered the other sacraments to small groups of Catholics. </p><p>He and his brother Roberto were arrested on trumped-up charges of attempting to assassinate Mexico’s president. Roberto was spared but Miguel was sentenced to face a firing squad on November 23, 1927. His funeral became a public demonstration of faith. He was beatified in 1988.</p> American Catholic Blog Virtues guide our behavior according to the directives of faith and reason, leading us toward true freedom based on self-control, which fills us with joy that comes from living a good and moral life.

 
PICKS OF THE WEEK
Peace and Good
"A practical and appealing daily guide to the Poor Man of Assisi." --Margaret Carney, O.S.F.
How Did a Rebellious Troubadour Change the Church?
Jon Sweeney sheds new light on the familiar tale of St. Francis.
Be Extraordinary!
Can a busy, ordinary person really make a difference in the lives of others?
Advent 2014
From the First Sunday of Advent through the Feast of the Baptism of the Lord, find inspiration for your Advent prayer time with this new book.
A Eucharistic Christmas
Advent and Christmas are the perfect time to reflect on the fact that God is with us always in the Eucharist.

 
CATHOLIC GREETINGS
Feast of Christ the King
The liturgical year ends as it begins, focusing on Our Lord’s eternal reign.
Feast of Christ the King
The liturgical year ends as it begins, focusing on Our Lord’s eternal reign.
Presentation of the Blessed Virgin Mary
God came to dwell in Mary, and sanctified her for a unique role in salvation history.
Praying for You
If you soon will be united with family around a holiday table, take a moment today to pray for those who spend holidays alone.
Thanksgiving
In America, Thanksgiving is one of the rare times when religion and civics intersect. Let us give thanks and praise to God every day.

Come find us at: Facebook | St. Anthony Messenger magazine Twitter | American Catholic YouTube | American Catholic


An AmericanCatholic.org Site from the Franciscans and Franciscan Media Copyright © 1996 - 2014