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High School Pallbearers View Comments
By Mary Ellen Pellegrini

The ministry is active whenever the need arises, even during student vacations. Pallbearers pray for the souls of the people whom they bury.

On a cold, snowy December morning, six young men ride silently past the James A. Garfield monument at Lake View Cemetery in Cleveland, Ohio. Founded in 1869, this sacred ground is the final resting place of an American president, John D. Rockefeller, Eliot Ness, members of President Abraham Lincoln’s cabinet, Civil War generals and many other notables.

This day, however, it’s not the rich and famous whose lives are being honored. It’s an elderly gentleman with no surviving family and a modest funeral contingent. The high school volunteers are accompanying the casket as pallbearers, suspending their Christmas break to mourn and pray for an individual whom they have never met.

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Mary Ellen Pellegrini of Girard, Ohio, is a regular contributor to The Catholic Exponent, the diocesan newspaper of Youngstown. She has written over 200 articles and two books on family life (both published by CWLA Press). She is married with three children and two grandchildren.

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Joseph the Worker: Apparently in response to the “May Day” celebrations for workers sponsored by Communists, Pius XII instituted the feast of St. Joseph the Worker in 1955. But the relationship between Joseph and the cause of workers has a much longer history. 
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