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Made in God's Image View Comments
By Kate Wicker

Many people obsess over their bodies, while others don’t take their health into account at all. Find middle ground. Recognize that your body is a gift and treat it with respect.
A FRIEND OF MINE told me recently that her sister exercises for one reason only: she knows her body is a gift from God, and she wants to show her gratitude by taking care of it. Sounds simple enough, right? But how many of us view our bodies, as well as how we treat them, with God in mind?

When I was in the grips of my eating disorder, I exercised compulsively, not because I desired health or wished to honor God, but only because I wanted to be thinner. Eating was not about fueling my body. It was about control. Micromanaging how much or how little I ate made me feel more powerful. I couldn’t make others love me, but I could make myself thinner.

It took several years of treatment and a lot of prayer for me to break free from disordered eating and a poor body image. Thankfully, nowadays when I break a sweat or reach for whole grains and veggies instead of processed food, it’s because I want to show appreciation for the body with which God has blessed me.

I also want to be healthy and strong so I’m better equipped to carry out God’s will for me, which, as a mother, includes the often exhausting work of taking care of four small and energetic children. My husband exercises and eats well so he has the stamina to work long hours to provide for our growing family.

We exercise and eat properly because that’s what we need to do to live healthy lives. But not everybody shares this kind of lifestyle.

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Kate Wicker is a wife, mother of four, freelance writer, and author of Weightless: Making Peace with Your Body (Servant Books). Learn more about her at katewicker.com.

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Clement: 
		<p>Clement of Rome was the third successor of St. Peter, reigning as pope during the last decade of the first century. He’s known as one of the Church’s five “Apostolic Fathers,” those who provided a direct link between the Apostles and later generations of Church Fathers. </p>
		<p>His <em>First Epistle to the Corinthians </em>was preserved and widely read in the early Church. This letter from the bishop of Rome to the Church in Corinth concerns a split that alienated a large number of the laity from the clergy. Deploring the unauthorized and unjustifiable division in the Corinthian community, Clement urged charity to heal the rift. <br /></p>
American Catholic Blog All Catholics would do well to keep in mind the power of the rosary and the message of Fatima. The rosary is not merely a devotional aid; it is a weapon of conversion, protection, and love. The rosary was given to us for such a time as this—never has this weapon been more needed than it is today.

 
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