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On Pilgrimage with Dorothy Day View Comments
By Illustrations by Michael O'Neill McGrath, OSFS

Dorothy Day’s public presence is well-known: journalist, 20th-century reformer, cofounder of the Catholic Worker movement, antiwar and civil-rights activist. But beyond her public persona, Day (1897–1980) lived a storied private life. Through her long-running column in the Catholic Worker newspaper, aptly titled “On Pilgrimage,” and her many other works, readers traveled with Day as she embarked on a journey to awaken the social conscience of a nation. Privately, Day was also making a spiritual pilgrimage, seeking personal enlightenment as well.

The following illustrations are from Michael O’Neill McGrath’s new book, Saved by Beauty (World Library Publications). We added text to help tell the story for our readers. All images are used with permission.

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Michael O’Neill McGrath, OSFS, is a painter, writer, and speaker who loves to make connections between art and faith. The illustrations in this article are included in his book Saved by Beauty: A Spiritual Journey with Dorothy Day (World Library Publications). Text for this story was written by Assistant Editor Rachel Zawila, who has a bachelor of journalism degree from the University of Missouri.

Thank you for your comments. Editors will review all posts before they are visible on the website.

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Joseph the Worker: Apparently in response to the “May Day” celebrations for workers sponsored by Communists, Pius XII instituted the feast of St. Joseph the Worker in 1955. But the relationship between Joseph and the cause of workers has a much longer history. 
<p>In a constantly necessary effort to keep Jesus from being removed from ordinary human life, the Church has from the beginning proudly emphasized that Jesus was a carpenter, obviously trained by Joseph in both the satisfactions and the drudgery of that vocation. Humanity is like God not only in thinking and loving, but also in creating. Whether we make a table or a cathedral, we are called to bear fruit with our hands and mind, ultimately for the building up of the Body of Christ.</p> American Catholic Blog It is much harder to criticize or to be angry with someone who wants to listen to you rather than lecture you or get angry in turn. Let people know that you are listening, that you know their pain, and that the message of respect for life also says that their lives are precious, no matter how strongly they disagree with you.

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