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Marianne Cope: America's Other New Saint View Comments
By James Breig

On June 29, 1860, a few months before Abraham Lincoln was elected president, a census taker arrived at the home of Peter Koob, in the Sixth Ward of Utica, a city in the middle of New York State.

Koob (the name was later regularized to “Cope”) was a Bavarian laborer. The remainder of the household also came from Bavaria: his wife, Barbara, and their children, Catherina, John, and Barbara. All of them were Catholic.

Barbara, who was 20, also held a job, described only as a “factory hand.” Within two years, however, her life radically changed when she entered the convent and became a member of the Sisters of St. Francis in nearby Syracuse. Bearing her new religious name, Sister Marianne Cope taught school, was a principal, established two hospitals, and fostered medical education. Such talent and determination led to her being named Mother General of her order.





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Catharine of Bologna: Some Franciscan saints led fairly public lives; Catharine represents the saints who served the Lord in obscurity. 
<p>Catharine, born in Bologna, was related to the nobility in Ferrara and was educated at court there. She received a liberal education at the court and developed some interest and talent in painting. In later years as a Poor Clare, Catharine sometimes did manuscript illumination and also painted miniatures. </p><p>At the age of 17, she joined a group of religious women in Ferrara. Four years later the whole group joined the Poor Clares in that city. Jobs as convent baker and portress preceded her selection as novice mistress. </p><p>In 1456, she and 15 other sisters were sent to establish a Poor Clare monastery in Florence. As abbess Catharine worked to preserve the peace of the new community. Her reputation for holiness drew many young women to the Poor Clare life. She was canonized in 1712.</p> American Catholic Blog Dear God, when you pour yourself into the little vase of my being, I suffer the agony of not being able to contain you. The inner walls of this heart feel as if they were about to burst, and I am surprised this has not happened already.


 
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