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Faith by Design View Comments
By James Breig

AS HOME DESIGNERS known for specializing in “downtown chic,” Bob and Cortney Novogratz can be seen applying their talents during their HGTV series, Home by Novogratz, which has added to the couple’s phenomenal success as interior designers and house flippers. Their success has brought them international fame, loads of money, and three houses scattered from New England to Brazil.

They’ve also received effusive compliments on their work, such as national publications that have praised “the design duo [who] create downtown magic” and lauded how they “have infused entire city blocks with sophistication and style.” But the Catholic pair—married for two decades and counting—looks much higher than lighting fixtures. As they raise their seven children to be religious, they also apply their faith to their work. Bob comments on the latter when he tells St. Anthony Messenger that their TV program de-emphasizes frivolous spending.

“You can have good design on a budget,” he states. “You don’t have to break the bank. Good taste and money don’t always go hand in hand. We have a European design philosophy. Americans are consumers and have too much stuff, so we use a little less stuff.” To that end, they often employ found objects, large family photographs, and unusual flea-market finds to decorate rooms.

The religious side of the family has occasionally been displayed on their TV series, which originated on Bravo and moved to HGTV. One episode, for example, dealt with the Baptism of their seventh child in a house crowded with relatives, friends, celebrities, and a priest.

Cortney’s blogs on their room designs are often packed with words like “chic,” “pop,” and “bold blasts of color,” but she is equally enthusiastic in talking about prayer, Church, and faith.

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James Breig is a veteran writer for Catholic newspapers, magazines, and books. He now authors a syndicated media column for dozens of Catholic  papers.

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Augustine of Canterbury: In the year 596, some 40 monks set out from Rome to evangelize the Anglo-Saxons in England. Leading the group was Augustine, the prior of their monastery in Rome. Hardly had he and his men reached Gaul (France) when they heard stories of the ferocity of the Anglo-Saxons and of the treacherous waters of the English Channel. Augustine returned to Rome and to the pope who had sent them—St. Gregory the Great (September 3 )—only to be assured by him that their fears were groundless. 
<p>Augustine again set out. This time the group crossed the English Channel and landed in the territory of Kent, ruled by King Ethelbert, a pagan married to a Christian, Bertha. Ethelbert received them kindly, set up a residence for them in Canterbury and within the year, on Pentecost Sunday, 597, was himself baptized. After being consecrated a bishop in France, Augustine returned to Canterbury, where he founded his see. He constructed a church and monastery near where the present cathedral, begun in 1070, now stands. As the faith spread, additional sees were established at London and Rochester. </p><p>Work was sometimes slow and Augustine did not always meet with success. Attempts to reconcile the Anglo-Saxon Christians with the original Briton Christians (who had been driven into western England by Anglo-Saxon invaders) ended in dismal failure. Augustine failed to convince the Britons to give up certain Celtic customs at variance with Rome and to forget their bitterness, helping him evangelize their Anglo-Saxon conquerors </p><p>Laboring patiently, Augustine wisely heeded the missionary principles—quite enlightened for the times—suggested by Pope Gregory the Great: purify rather than destroy pagan temples and customs; let pagan rites and festivals be transformed into Christian feasts; retain local customs as far as possible. The limited success Augustine achieved in England before his death in 605, a short eight years after he arrived in England, would eventually bear fruit long after in the conversion of England. Augustine of Canterbury can truly be called the “Apostle of England.”</p> American Catholic Blog When we go through pain it is easy to feel abandoned or forgotten, but suffering doesn’t mean God doesn’t love us, He does. Even Jesus suffered, and He was completely without sin.

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