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St. Clare's Gamble View Comments
By Ramona Miller, OSF

THROUGHOUT the world in 2012, the 800th anniversary of the founding of the Poor Clares is being celebrated. The simple life of St. Clare, who lived in a small place outside Assisi’s medieval walls, still speaks to us. Why? Her spiritual quest resonates with our yearnings to live authentically from the fire of love within. Clare’s virtuous life made God’s love real to countless others. Many stories about her life encourage us to grow in holiness, to imitate her enthusiastic love.

On Palm Sunday 1212, worshipers at the Cathedral of San Rufino were joyfully anticipating Holy Week celebrations. After 10 years of war, Assisi’s citizens were looking forward to being reunited at their church. In the cathedral’s piazza after Mass, they were all abuzz over the most unusual behavior of Clare, daughter of Favarone and Ortulana.

Clare had not left her place to join the other elegantly dressed noblewomen receiving a palm from Bishop Guido. She seemed rapt in a dream. When the bishop left the sanctuary to give her a palm branch, they wondered: Was this part of the ritual? Why did Bishop Guido notice her? They could not have guessed that he was blessing her plan to abandon her home and dedicate herself to a life of radical poverty and prayer.

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Ramona Miller, OSF, associate minister of the Sisters of St. Francis of Rochester, Minnesota, has led groups to Assisi for the Franciscan Pilgrimage Program for 25 years. She wrote In the Footsteps of St. Clare (Franciscan Institute Publications) and coauthored Praying with St. Clare (St. Mary’s Press).

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Michael Giedroyc: A life of physical pain and mental torment didn’t prevent Michael Giedroyc from achieving holiness. 
<p>Born near Vilnius, Lithuania, Michael suffered from physical and permanent handicaps from birth. He was a dwarf who had the use of only one foot. Because of his delicate physical condition, his formal education was frequently interrupted. But over time, Michael showed special skills at metalwork. Working with bronze and silver, he created sacred vessels, including chalices.</p><p>He traveled to Kraków, Poland, where he joined the Augustinians. He received permission to live the life of a hermit in a cell adjoining the monastery. There Michael spent his days in prayer, fasted and abstained from all meat and lived to an old age. Though he knew the meaning of suffering throughout his years, his rich spiritual life brought him consolation. Michael’s long life ended in 1485 in Kraków.</p><p>Five hundred years later, Pope John Paul II visited the city and spoke to the faculty of the Pontifical Academy of Theology. The 15th century in Kraków, the pope said, was “the century of saints.” Among those he cited was Blessed Michael Giedroyc.</p> American Catholic Blog The French novelist Leon Bloy once said that there is only one tragedy in life: not to be a saint. It may be that God permits some suffering as the only way to wake someone from a dream of self-sufficiency and illusory happiness.

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