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Franciscan author Richard Rohr helps us travel day-by-day through Lent in this condensation from his book Wondrous Encounters: Scripture for Lent.

Wondrous Encounters: Day by Day through Lent
By: Richard Rohr, O.F.M.


Each issue carries an imprimatur from the Archdiocese of Cincinnati. Reprinting prohibited
Ash Wednesday
2 Cor 5:20—6:2
It seems that we need beginnings, or everything eventually devolves and declines into unnecessary and sad endings. You were made for so much more! So today you must pray for the desire to desire!
 
Thursday
Dt 30:15-20; Lk 9:22-25
We must place our bet, set our trajectory, make a choice, surrender to the Great Love...just be ready for the trials and confusion into which this clear choice will lead you.
 
Friday
Is 58:1-9a; Mt 9:14-15
Isaiah makes a very upfront demand for social justice, non-aggression, taking our feet off the necks of the oppressed, sharing our bread with the hungry, clothing the naked, letting go of our sense of entitlement. How often we miss the point!
 
Saturday
Is 58:9b-14; Lk 5:27-32
“God, where am I trapped and unable to see it?” That may be the best starter prayer for Lent. 
  
 First week of Lent 
 
Sunday
Mt 4:1-11; Mk 1:12-15; Lk 4:1-13
In all three years of the lectionary cycle, the Gospel for the first Sunday of Lent is devoted to the temptation of Jesus in the desert. Examining temptations is a good way to begin Lent. Most people’s daily ethical choices are not between total good and total evil, but between various shades of good, a partial good that is wrongly perceived as an absolute good (because of the self as the central reference point), or even evil that disguises itself as good. These are what get us into trouble.
 
Monday
Lv 19:1-2, 11-18; Mt 25:31-46
Jesus’ “commandments” go far beyond mere boundary-keeping. They actually move beyond all boundaries to take care of those who did not make it, do not fit in. These are the outsider, the criminal, the vulnerable and the weak. It is quite a leap.
 
Tuesday
Is 55:10-11; Mt 6:7-15
Forgiveness is not some churchy technique or formula. Forgiveness is constant from God’s side, which should become a calm, joyous certainty on our side.
 
Wednesday
Jon 3:1-10; Lk 11:29-32
Faith is the leap into the water, now with the lived experience that there is One who can and will catch you—and lead you where you need to go!
 
Thursday
Est C 12, 14-16, 23-25; Mt 7:7-12
God seems to plant within us the desire to pray for what God already wants to give us. Even better, it’s what God has already begun to give to us!
 
Friday
Ez 18:21-28; Mt 5:20-26
Human consciousness is ready to be invited by Jesus beyond mere external observance of rights and wrongs, to inner attitudes, motivations, judgments and opinions.
 
Saturday
Dt 26:16-19; Mt 5:43-48
You are to love with the same kind of love that God loves you, which is total unconditional love. This is the summit, the goal of all Jesus’ moral teaching. 
  
Second week of Lent
 
Sunday
Mt 17:1-9; Mk 9:2-10; Lk 9:28b-36 
After this awesome and consoling epiphany, there is clear mention of “a cloud that overshadows” everything. We have what appears to be full light, yet there is still darkness. Knowing, yet not knowing. Getting it, and yet not getting it at all. Isn’t that the very character of all true Mystery and every in-depth encounter?
 
Monday
Dn 9:4b-10; Lk 6:36-38
It appears that humans can only know themselves through the gaze of others. We call it mirroring.
Good parents, like God, naturally bless the child through their receptive and affirming faces.
 
Tuesday
Is 1:10, 16-20; Mt 23:1-12
Nothing any of us could say today would match Jesus’ anger and judgment on hypocrisy in
spiritual leadership and self-serving religious authority.
 
Wednesday
Jer 18:18-20; Mt 20:17-28
Jesus, against all odds, expectations and human programming, insists that we make the preemptive and positive move into “drinking of the cup” ourselves instead of always asking others to drink it.
 
Thursday
Jer 17:5-10; Lk 16:19-31
We will all receive exactly what our lives say we really want and desire: Love is always torment for the hateful. Final torment is impossible for the loving.
 
Friday
Gn 37:3-4, 12-13a, 17b-28a; Mt 21:33-43, 45-46
I know that any kind of defeat or humiliation is not the American way, but it is surely the biblical way. There the pattern is rather clear, and there is no going up until you go down.
 
Saturday
Mi 7:14-15, 18-20; Lk 15:1-3, 11-32
The story that is strangely called “The Prodigal Son” is much more about “The Prodigious Father” who seems to love to excess! All scholars seem to agree that this story most perfectly represents Jesus’ active and operative image of his personal experience of God. 
 
Third week of Lent
 
Sunday
Ex 17:3-7; Rom 5:1-2, 5-8; Jn 4:5-42
This long and truly mystical Gospel story of the Samaritan woman at the well was already used by the early Church in immediate preparation of the new candidates for Baptism on Holy Saturday. All the elements of invitation, disclosure, unfolding levels of meaning, intimacy, reciprocity and enlightenment are here for the taking. This multi-leveled story surely deserves our overall theme of a “wondrous loop” of giver, given and gift. The whole point of the story of the Woman at the Well is that unless you experience the Spirit, which Jesus says is “the water that I will give which will turn into a spring within you, welling up unto eternal life” (4:14), the whole thing falls apart.
 
Monday
2 Kgs 5:1-15b; Lk 4:24-30
The insider often misses the grace, while the outsider gets it.
 
Tuesday
Dn 3:25, 34-43; Mt 18:21-35
Jesus invites all of us in this rather easy-to-understand story into God’s nonsensical loving “from the heart.”
 
Wednesday
Dt 4:1, 5-9; Mt 5:17-19
Jesus knows that laws and dogmas are not goals or ends in themselves, and in that he disagrees with much immature religion, but they are a necessary beginning point.
 
Thursday
Jer 7:23-28; Lk 11:14-23
When you try to fight evil, you are invariably accused of doing evil yourself. Isn’t that interesting and strange? Read history, and especially the lives of whistleblowers, justice seekers and peace workers.
 
Friday
Hos 14:2-10; Mk 12:28-34
Hosea’s wife became the image of the soul before God. Think about that awhile.
 
Saturday
Hos 6:1-6; Lk 18:9-14
Jesus is never upset at sinners! He is only upset with people who do not think they are sinners.


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Fourth week of Lent
 
Sunday
1 Sm 16:1b, 6-7, 10-13a; Eph 5:8-14; Jn 9:1-41
As Christianity’s High Holy Days draw near, this Sunday of the “Second Scrutiny” of the catechumens revolves entirely around the theme of light and seeing things truthfully. This problem is at the heart of what almost all ancients saw as the “tragic sense of life.” Our lack of self-knowledge and our lack of wisdom make humans do very stupid and self-destructive things. Because humans cannot see their own truth very well, they do not read reality very well either. We all have our tragic flaws and blind spots. Humans always need more “light” or enlightenment about themselves and about the endless mystery of God.
 
Monday
Is 65:17-21; Jn 4:43-54
The circle of the biblical revelation keeps widening to create that “new earth” of Isaiah. Christians, early on, call themselves catholic or universal. Here comes everybody!
 
Tuesday
Ez 47:1-9, 12; Jn 5:1-16
Jesus mirrors his best self for the paralytic man. He gives him back his own power.
 
Wednesday
Is 49:8-15; Jn 5:17-30
Each of us is our own truthful judge and our own best friend if we but look honestly into the perfect and compassionate Divine Mirror: Jesus, the Son.
 
Thursday
Ex 32:7-14; Jn 5:31-47
Prayer, more than anything, seeks, creates and preserves relationship—which is always both giving and receiving.
 
Friday
Wis 2:1a, 12-22; Jn 7:1-2, 10, 25-30
Vengeance is often an open but denied secret when fear and gossip reign in a society.
 
Saturday
Jer 11:18-20; Jn 7:40-53
As people become more afraid and insecure, they do not know how to access their own soul, move to prayer, or toward their better instincts. 
 
Fifth week of Lent
 
Sunday
Ez 37:12-14; Rom 8:8-11; Jn 11:1-45
In a brilliant finale to the Lazarus story, Jesus invites the onlookers to join him in making resurrection happen: “Move the stone away!...Unbind him, and let him go free!” It seems that we have a part to play in creating a culture of life and resurrection. We must unbind one another from our fears and doubts about the last enemy, death. We must now “see that the world is bathed in light” and allow others to enjoy the same seeing—through our lived life. The stone to be moved is always our fear of death, the finality of death, any blindness that keeps us from seeing that death is merely a part of the Larger Mystery called Life. It does not have the final word.
 
Monday
Dn 13:1-9, 15-17, 19-30, 33-62; Jn 8:1-11
Jesus’ love is so gracious and universal that, looking down, he even wanted to save them from the condemnation of his eyes: “Neither do I condemn you,” he says to both the woman and the men.
 
Tuesday
Nm 21:4-9; Jn 8:21-30
We need to “lift up” and “gaze upon” the crucifix, the transformative image, just as Moses first did the serpent in the desert.
 
Wednesday
Dn 3:14-20, 91-92, 95;
Jn 8:31-42

Most Christians would probably be slow to admit that by these criteria almost all of us would have opposed Jesus: “This is not our tradi­tion! He is not from our group! He has no credentials!”
 
Thursday
Gn 17:3-9; Jn 8:51-59
Many never get beyond “religion as requirements.” What does your religion require of you?
 
Friday
Jer 20:10-13; Jn 10:31-42
They “try to arrest” Jesus, just as much of Christian history has arrested, feared and denied any message of actual union with God.
 
Saturday
Ez 37:21-28; Jn 11:45-56
There are still two ways of gathering, the way of fear and hate and the way of love. But do not yourself be afraid, because Jesus is still “gathering.” 
  
Holy Week/Triduum 
 
Palm Sunday
Is 50:4-7; Phil 2:6-11; Mt 26:14—27:66
Jesus is set as the human blueprint, the standard in the sky, the oh-so-hopeful pattern of divine transformation. Who would have presumed that the way up could be the way down? It is, as Paul says, “the secret mystery.” Trust the down, and God will take care of the up. This leaves humanity in solidarity with the life cycle, but also with one another, with no need to create success stories for itself, or to create failure stories for others. Humanity in Jesus is free to be human and soulful instead of any false climbing into “Spirit.” This was supposed to change everything, and it still will.
 
Monday
Is 42:1-7; Jn 12:1-11
“There will always be poor in the land. I command you therefore, always be open-handed with anyone in the country who is in need or is poor” (Dt 15:11). Unfortunately, only the first phrase is quoted in the Gospel text.
 
Tuesday
Is 49:1-6; Jn 13:21-33, 36-38
The more love and hope you have invested in another person, the deeper is the pain of betrayal.
 
Wednesday
Is 50:4-9a; Mt 26:14-25
Faithful Jesus, your faith was tried just like mine, but even more. Give me courage to do the same in the time of trial.
 
Sacred Triduum
All pivots around the Triduum, and this necessary transformation of the soul. Yes, Jesus is the one who walks it consciously first, but it is so that we can trustfully follow.


Richard Rohr is a Franciscan priest and founding director of the Center for Action and Contemplation in Albuquerque, New Mexico. This Update is condensed from the book Wondrous Encounters: Scripture for Lent, by Richard Rohr (St. Anthony Messenger Press).

NEXT: Changes in the Mass by Fr. Rick Hilgartner

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Fidelis of Sigmaringen: If a poor man needed some clothing, Fidelis would often give the man the clothes right off his back. Complete generosity to others characterized this saint's life. 
<p>Born in 1577, Mark Rey (Fidelis was his religious name) became a lawyer who constantly upheld the causes of the poor and oppressed people. Nicknamed "the poor man's lawyer," Fidelis soon grew disgusted with the corruption and injustice he saw among his colleagues. He left his law career to become a priest, joining his brother George as a member of the Capuchin Order. His wealth was divided between needy seminarians and the poor. </p><p>As a follower of Francis, Fidelis continued his devotion to the weak and needy. During a severe epidemic in a city where he was guardian of a friary, Fidelis cared for and cured many sick soldiers. </p><p>He was appointed head of a group of Capuchins sent to preach against the Calvinists and Zwinglians in Switzerland. Almost certain violence threatened. Those who observed the mission felt that success was more attributable to the prayer of Fidelis during the night than to his sermons and instructions. </p><p>He was accused of opposing the peasants' national aspirations for independence from Austria. While he was preaching at Seewis, to which he had gone against the advice of his friends, a gun was fired at him, but he escaped unharmed. A Protestant offered to shelter Fidelis, but he declined, saying his life was in God's hands. On the road back, he was set upon by a group of armed men and killed. </p><p>He was canonized in 1746. Fifteen years later, the Congregation for the Propagation of the Faith, which was established in 1622, recognized him as its first martyr.</p> American Catholic Blog Obedience means total surrender and wholehearted free service to the poorest of the poor. All the difficulties that come in our work are the result of disobedience.

 
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CATHOLIC GREETINGS
Easter Thursday
Jesus is calling each one of us to resurrection. How will you respond?
Easter Wednesday
May the Lord be with us as he was with the faithful on that first Easter.
Easter Tuesday
If you’re taking a break this week from work or school, keep in touch with a Catholic Greetings e-card.
Easter Monday
It’s not too late to send an Easter e-card to friends near and far. Let the celebration continue for 50 days!
Easter
Catholic Greetings and AmericanCatholic.org wish you a most holy and joyous Easter season!



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