AmericanCatholic.org
 
Skip Navigation Links
Home
Catholic News
Saints
Seasonal
Special Reports
Movies
Shopping
Donate
Share:
Facebook
Twitter
Google Plus
LinkedIn
Email
RSS Feeds
Day 6 of John Feister's trip to the Middle East takes him to Mar Elias College in Galilee.

Special Features
Day 6: Galilee
Now, late in the week, some themes are emerging. The first, of course, is one we’ve known: The Holy Land is in crisis. That crisis is running Christians out. But as we scratch below the surface in our travels and conversations, it becomes clear that the political situation of the Palestinians—that is, the local Christian community—is the context for the crisis of Christianity.

I suppose we could have or even should have known this, but we Americans seem allergic to international news. “Why can’t they all get along?” we might say. Or “If only they can learn from us how democracy works, then they’ll be o.k.” Much of that energy as driven our military involvement in the country next door to Jordan, Iraq.

day 6 Mar Elias College DSC_0454
(photo by John Feister)
During our visit to Mar Elias College in Ibellein (in Galilee) today, we heard from Elias Abu, a teacher and activist who has been on extensive speaking tours in North America. The college serves 1,100 students, with a devotion to Palestinian identity. “We are not terrorists,” pleaded Abu, “We are the terrorized! We are peace lovers, peacemakers!” We sat around a conference table with Abu and a group of students who, once again, looked much like students back in the United States.

Interestingly, some reported friendships with Jewish students in various parts of Israel, via the Internet. It’s a lot more accessible than face-to-face contact. During our hour or so together, before we ate lunch with the group, Abu quoted James Baldwin, who observed the ignorance of so many Americans about  the plight of blacks. “It’s innocence that constitutes the crime,” wrote Baldwin.

On Wednesday, at Bethlehem College, I had looked out looked out from the campus over a great expanse, to the hilltop Jewish developments (a.k.a. “settlements”) and marveled at a bridge spanning the large valley. One of our Palestinian guides (he himself had spent most of his career teaching in the United States) looked at me and said, dryly, “You bought it.” He was, of course, referring to the massive flow of U.S. tax dollars into the Israeli government. I can’t say that I had ever thought of my tax dollars as paying for an apartheid system here in Israel. That bridge I was admiring is itself part of a huge Israeli highway system set up to allow Jewish Israelis to move about in the country outside of the inconvenience and dangers—real or perceived—of the Palestinian checkpoints.

On this day we also had the privilege of talking, close up, with another renowned Palestinian advocate besides Elias Abu. In Haifa, overlooking the Mediterranean, we met with Archbishop Elias Chacour, Melkite Greek Catholic Archbishop of Galilee, Akko, Nazareth and Haifa. An active promoter of peace between Arabs and Israelis, he is author of Blood Brothers, his well-known story of growing up Palestinian. We’ll take up in detail what he said in a later report at AmericanCatholic.org.

But for now, consider these words he told us: “We don’t need more cruelty; we need a committed friend. Go in peace back home to tell what you have seen.”

It reminds me of another man from Galilee





Paid Advertisement
Ads contrary to Catholic teachings should be reported to our webmaster. Include ad link.


Gregory the Great: Coming events cast their shadows before: Gregory was the prefect of Rome before he was 30. After five years in office he resigned, founded six monasteries on his Sicilian estate and became a Benedictine monk in his own home at Rome. 
<p>Ordained a priest, he became one of the pope's seven deacons, and also served six years in the East as papal representative in Constantinople. He was recalled to become abbot, and at the age of 50 was elected pope by the clergy and people of Rome. </p><p>He was direct and firm. He removed unworthy priests from office, forbade taking money for many services, emptied the papal treasury to ransom prisoners of the Lombards and to care for persecuted Jews and the victims of plague and famine. He was very concerned about the conversion of England, sending 40 monks from his own monastery. He is known for his reform of the liturgy, for strengthening respect for doctrine. Whether he was largely responsible for the revision of "Gregorian" chant is disputed. </p><p>Gregory lived in a time of perpetual strife with invading Lombards and difficult relations with the East. When Rome itself was under attack, he interviewed the Lombard king. </p><p>An Anglican historian has written: "It is impossible to conceive what would have been the confusion, the lawlessness, the chaotic state of the Middle Ages without the medieval papacy; and of the medieval papacy, the real father is Gregory the Great." </p><p>His book, <i>Pastoral Care</i>, on the duties and qualities of a bishop, was read for centuries after his death. He described bishops mainly as physicians whose main duties were preaching and the enforcement of discipline. In his own down-to-earth preaching, Gregory was skilled at applying the daily gospel to the needs of his listeners. Called "the Great," Gregory has been given a place with Augustine (August 28), Ambrose (December 7) and Jerome (September 30)as one of the four key doctors of the Western Church.</p> American Catholic Blog Loving trust and total surrender made Our Lady say yes to the message of the angel, and cheerfulness made her run in haste to serve her cousin Elizabeth. So much in our lives, too, is saying yes to Jesus, and running haste to serve him in the poorest of the poor.  –Mother Theresa


Life's Great Questions



 
CATHOLIC GREETINGS
Holy Eucharist
In the Mass, we meet the Risen Christ who is really and truly present in that Sacred host.

Back to School
We ask God to bless their school year with friendships, wisdom and peace.

Sympathy
Find the sentiment you want to express for any occasion at CatholicGreetings.org.

Birthday
Every day is somebody’s birthday and a good reason to celebrate!

Mary's Flower - Lily of the Valley

Show your devotion to Mary by sending an e-card in her honor.





Come find us at: Facebook | St. Anthony Messenger magazine Twitter | American Catholic YouTube | American Catholic


An AmericanCatholic.org Site from the Franciscans and Franciscan Media Copyright © 1996 - 2015