AmericanCatholic.org
 
Skip Navigation Links
Home
Catholic News
Saints
Seasonal
Special Reports
Movies
Shopping
Donate
Share:
Facebook
Twitter
Google Plus
LinkedIn
Email
RSS Feeds
John Feister begins his tour of the Middle East in Amman Jordan, visiting with Christian refugees from Iraq.

Special Features
Day 1: Amman, Jordan
After traveling for a day and a half, we got off of a bus the Amman West hotel, in Amman Jordan, at 4 a.m. and were told to be ready to roll by 10. It’s going to be that kind of trip! We went from 10 a.m. today until about 9:30.

If there were a theme for today it would be Iraq. Thousands of Christians escaping the violence of Iraq have landed next door in Jordan. Many of those who had to flee—5,000 by a count we learned today—are Christians, whether Orthodox or Catholic, who have no place now in a society that struggles between Sunni and Shia Muslims. They have fled persecution. Today we heard firsthand accounts.

Dawood Salim Matte and his family, refugees from Iraq, wait in Amman for the chance to move to North America. They've been here for a year, cared for by the Franciscan sisters. (photo by John Feister)
We visited the Franciscan Sisters of Mary convent here in Amman to learn of their presence among the refugees. Actually there was a group of refugee families who had come to the convent to meet us and tell their stories directly. There I met some amazing families who are stuck in Jordan, waiting to see what might happen next. They all seem to want to get to the U.S. or Canada, where some family members are already (though some seek Europe). Nothing is simple, though. Visas are required. They suffer the plight of refugees everywhere: No one really wants them, unless they can prove their case of need beyond a doubt. I interviewed and photographed some families, and recorded by Flip-video some of the conversations. We’ll try to get some of that online to share with you—kind of a sneak preview to what I’ll be writing for St. Anthony Messenger.

After an incredible Jordanian lunch, we piled in our tour bus and headed across town to meet with Father Raymond Massouli, a Chaldean Catholic pastor who started a parish to serve the Iraqi refugees back in 2003. Our group of journalists sat and talked in-depth in his tiny office, then we met more families. Some of the stories were horrifying—the woman whose family was in a terrorist explosion is one I won’t forget. They hope to all move to Detroit—if they can get their visas. They’ve been waiting a year already.

Back at the hotel, now in the early evening, we had a dinner with two bishops, one a Latin-rite (Roman) Catholic, the other a Melkite Catholic. They answered many questions informally over a dinner with our journalist group. One, Bishop Selim, told us about the forthcoming papal synod on the Middle East. It’s not about Christian-Jewish, or Christian-Muslim relations. “Rather,” he said, “it’s about how to build one heart and one mind among Christians.” 



Click here to go back to the main page.




Paid Advertisement
Ads contrary to Catholic teachings should be reported to our webmaster. Include ad link.


Oliver Plunkett: The name of today's saint is especially familiar to the Irish and the English—and with good reason. The English martyred Oliver Plunkett for defending the faith in his native Ireland during a period of severe persecution. 
<p>Born in County Meath in 1629, he studied for the priesthood in Rome and was ordained there in 1654. After some years of teaching and service to the poor of Rome he was appointed Archbishop of Armagh in Ireland. Four years later, in 1673, a new wave of anti-Catholic persecution began, forcing Archbishop Plunkett to do his pastoral work in secrecy and disguise and to live in hiding. Meanwhile, many of his priests were sent into exile; schools were closed; Church services had to be held in secret and convents and seminaries were suppressed. As archbishop, he was viewed as ultimately responsible for any rebellion or political activity among his parishioners. 
</p><p>Archbishop Plunkett was arrested and imprisoned in Dublin Castle in 1679, but his trial was moved to London. After deliberating for 15 minutes, a jury found him guilty of fomenting revolt. He was hanged, drawn and quartered in July 1681. 
</p><p>Pope Paul VI canonized Oliver Plunkett in 1975.</p> American Catholic Blog God had a plan even before he created Adam and Eve. God is never caught off guard. He knows all. He sees all. And he is working all things together for the good of his children. Nothing can stop his plan of mercy and love.


The Spirit of Saint Francis



 
CATHOLIC GREETINGS
Vacation
Enter the holiday spirit by sending an e-card to schedule a summer cookout!

Blessed Junipero Serra
This Franciscan friar was instrumental in founding many of California’s mission churches.

Happy Birthday
May this birthday mark the beginning of new and exciting adventures!

Sts. Peter and Paul
Honored both separately and together, these apostles were probably martyred during the reign of the emperor Nero.

Wedding
Help the bride and groom see their love as a mirror of God’s love.



Come find us at: Facebook | St. Anthony Messenger magazine Twitter | American Catholic YouTube | American Catholic


An AmericanCatholic.org Site from the Franciscans and Franciscan Media Copyright © 1996 - 2015