AmericanCatholic.org
 
Skip Navigation Links
Home
Year of Mercy
Catholic News
Saints
Seasonal
Special Reports
Shopping
Donate
Blog
Share:
Facebook
Twitter
Google Plus
LinkedIn
Email
RSS Feeds
Jennifer Scroggins talks to Syriac Catholic Patriarch Ignatius Youssef III Younan about the fate of Iraqi Christians.

Special Features
Day 5:Beirut, Lebanon

Memorial to Priests Killed in Baghdad.(photo by Jennifer Scroggins)
A shepherd would never encourage his flock to flee, yet that’s exactly the dilemma facing at least one prominent Christian leader in the Middle East. Syriac Catholic Patriarch Ignatius Youssef III Younan is mourning the recent attacks against Iraqi Christians while also grieving for what he fears is a future marked by jihad and the continued rapid decline of Christianity in the volatile region, particularly Iraq.

On Oct. 31, 50 people, including two priests, were killed during Mass in Baghdad when armed men burst into Our Lady of Salvation church. On Nov. 10, 11 roadside bombs were detonated in three primarily Christian areas in Baghdad, in addition to attacks on other Christian neighborhoods that same day.

The violence against Christians clearly is escalating, leaving the faithful and their leaders feeling powerless. “For those who survive, what can we tell them?” Patriarch Younan says Nov. 11, addressing a group of North American journalists. “They feel abandoned by everyone.”

Syriac Catholic Patriarch Ignatius Youssef III Younan. (photo by Jennifer Scroggins)
Human Rights Watch says in 2008, Iraq was home to 675,000 Christians—down from 1 million in 2003, when the United States led the invasion to oust Saddam Hussein from power.

Mirella Chucrallah, a social worker who aids displaced Iraqis in Lebanon for the organization Caritas, says the current wave of emigration consists of Iraqis who initially resisted departing their homeland. Many Baghdad residents fled to the north country but now see such a widespread threat, they feel compelled to leave Iraq entirely.

“They left Baghdad for other cities with hope to return,” Chucrallah says. “But now, nothing is left. They are totally desperate now.” In many cases, Iraqis are coming to Lebanon on three-month tourism visas and then staying illegally. Chucrallah says Lebanon is the best option for many families because countries such as Jordan and Syria often will not grant visas to Iraqi men.

Mirella Chucrallah, Caritas social worker. (photo by Jennifer Scroggins)
While Chucrallah and Caritas work to provide legal, medical, emotional and physical support to families in flight, Patriarch Younan ponders what can be done to stem the exodus in the first place.

“It’s a train we can’t stop because of many factors,” he says. His foremost concern is providing protection for Christians still in Iraq. While Sunni and Shiite Muslims battle for control of the country, the Christian minority is easy to attack as terrorists take advantage of the lack of government, Patriarch Younan says.

He notes that there are some 50 Christian institutions in Baghdad, including hospitals and schools that serve Muslims as well as Christians. Yet Patriarch Younan says doctors are spending the night in their hospitals, afraid to leave for fear of violence.

He also points out that many attacks take place during the day—not under cover of darkness. “Where are the security forces?” he asks, a tone of urgency in his voice.

Patriarch Younan, who served the Syriac Catholic community in New Jersey from 1986-2009, says the United States’ invasion of Iraq in 2003 is not to blame for the Muslim-Christian issues at work in Iraq now. “The main issue with killing Christians, persecuting them, is neither Israeli nor U.S. intervention in Iraq,” Patriarch Younan says. “Of course, it has aggravated it because it wasn’t well-planned. “There was a dictator in Iraq and the man could oppress his people as he wanted, and few democratic nations would criticize him because of oil interests.”

Patriarch Younan says he visited Iraq in 2001 and saw a country where “people were like in a large prison.” Now, he says, Hussein is gone, but Christians are the weakest segment of the population and they are viewed as “infidels” by Muslims, who will not distinguish religion from politics. The intra-Islamic conflicts, Patriarch Younan says, make him skeptical that the U.S. will be able to make good on its plans to withdraw combat troops from Iraq.

“I don’t think the U.S. government will be so naive as to withdraw completely from Iraq,” he says. “We all know what kind of tensions exist between Sunnis and Shia. (The U.S. has) to stay, not just for the region, but for the whole world. “They have to be careful until we have a strong government in Iraq. Iran will be the first to get hegemony on Iraq.”

Patriarch Younan’s frustration is obvious as he speaks. In the Middle East, it seems religious leaders also are called to be political leaders, even if only tangentially. Patriarch Younan describes the situation of Christians in Iraq as “a kind of modern genocide.” He calls for the Iraqi government, such as it is, to protect Christians as “true citizens” and exhorts the international community to intercede on behalf of the Christian community.

The suffering has to end, he says. “Enough is enough. They need not only words, but acts.”

Click here for more daily reports from Lebanon.


View ACO in Lebanon in a larger map




Paid Advertisement
Ads contrary to Catholic teachings should be reported to our webmaster. Include ad link.


Mary Magdalene de' Pazzi: Mystical ecstasy is the elevation of the spirit to God in such a way that the person is aware of this union with God while both internal and external senses are detached from the sensible world. Mary Magdalene de' Pazzi was so generously given this special gift of God that she is called the "ecstatic saint." 
<p>She was born into a noble family in Florence in 1566. The normal course would have been for Catherine de' Pazzi to have married wealth and enjoyed comfort, but she chose to follow her own path. At nine she learned to meditate from the family confessor. She made her first Communion at the then-early age of 10 and made a vow of virginity one month later. When 16, she entered the Carmelite convent in Florence because she could receive Communion daily there. </p><p>Catherine had taken the name Mary Magdalene and had been a novice for a year when she became critically ill. Death seemed near so her superiors let her make her profession of vows from a cot in the chapel in a private ceremony. Immediately after, she fell into an ecstasy that lasted about two hours. This was repeated after Communion on the following 40 mornings. These ecstasies were rich experiences of union with God and contained marvelous insights into divine truths. </p><p>As a safeguard against deception and to preserve the revelations, her confessor asked Mary Magdalene to dictate her experiences to sister secretaries. Over the next six years, five large volumes were filled. The first three books record ecstasies from May of 1584 through Pentecost week the following year. This week was a preparation for a severe five-year trial. The fourth book records that trial and the fifth is a collection of letters concerning reform and renewal. Another book, <i>Admonitions</i>, is a collection of her sayings arising from her experiences in the formation of women religious. </p><p>The extraordinary was ordinary for this saint. She read the thoughts of others and predicted future events. During her lifetime, she appeared to several persons in distant places and cured a number of sick people. </p><p>It would be easy to dwell on the ecstasies and pretend that Mary Magdalene only had spiritual highs. This is far from true. It seems that God permitted her this special closeness to prepare her for the five years of desolation that followed when she experienced spiritual dryness. She was plunged into a state of darkness in which she saw nothing but what was horrible in herself and all around her. She had violent temptations and endured great physical suffering. She died in 1607 at 41, and was canonized in 1669.</p> American Catholic Blog Lord, keep me in your care. Guard me in my actions. Teach me to love, and help me to turn to you throughout the day. The world is filled with temptations. As I move through my day, keep me close. May those I encounter feel your loving presence. Lord, be the work of my hands and my heart. Amen.


The Chime Travelers the Sign of the Carved Cross



 
CATHOLIC GREETINGS
Praying for You
Let your pastor know that you prayed for him today, or that you will pray for him tomorrow.

Birthday
Best wishes for a joyous and peaceful birthday!

Most Holy Trinity
The Trinity illustrates the community of love between the Father, the Son, and the Holy Spirit.

Armed Forces Day (U.S.)
Remember those in the service of our nation with your prayers and support.

Most Holy Trinity
The Trinity illustrates the community of love between the Father, the Son, and the Holy Spirit.



Come find us at: Facebook | St. Anthony Messenger magazine Twitter | American Catholic YouTube | American Catholic


An AmericanCatholic.org Site from the Franciscans and Franciscan Media Copyright © 1996 - 2016