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Special Features
Day 2: Antilyas, Lebanon


St. Elias Maronite church.(photo by Jennifer Scroggins)
St. Elias was an Old Testament figure who slew the priest of Baal; St. Charbel was a 19th century Lebanese Maronite who became a hermit and is known for his silence and selfless prayer. So what could the two possibly have in common? Just the devotion of an entire nation.

Lebanon has been ripped apart by war for decades and is an often volatile blend of faith traditions and confessions, with a primarily Shiite Muslim southern region and a mainly Christian northern region. Where the two sides meet is in their appreciation for Elias and Charbel.


Children's Mass at St. Elias, November 7.(photo by Jennifer Scroggins)
St. Elias Maronite Church in Antelias is a parish of some 40,000 Christians, and it’s renowned throughout the Middle East. The faithful have been known to visit from well beyond Lebanon’s borders, and on St. Elias’ feast day, July 20, Muslims and Christians alike participate in Eucharistic adoration in the wee hours.

According to Brother Peter Haddad, that’s because St. Elias is a “common point” for both religions due to his roots in the Old Testament. Haddad, 24, who will take his vows Dec. 26, says Elias is someone all faith traditions can believe in.

Parishioner Tamara Chamoun, 13, echoed those sentiments—and clearly plans to live out a message of peace as she practices her faith into adulthood. “We’re all God’s sons and daughters,” said Chamoun, who said she has close friends who are Muslims. “God doesn’t separate us. … He likes us equal.”

Shrine of St. Charbel.(photo by Jennifer Scroggins)
That same spirit can be witnessed at the shrine to St. Charbel at the Monastery of St. Maron in Annaya. The shrine receives 4 billion visitors a year, many who come seeking Charbel’s intercession for physical or spiritual healing.

Father Louis Matar, who was superior of the monastery for 23 years and officially records Charbel’s miracles, said the desire for grace crosses lines of all faiths and confessions. One of Matar’s favorite stories, in fact, tells of an Iranian Shiite family whose son was in a coma following an accident. While at the hospital, the man’s mother met a Maronite Lebanese woman and told the Christian she and her family had lost their faith. The Maronite gave a picture of Charbel to the distraught mother, who in turn put the photo under her son’s pillow. Indeed, the young Shiite was healed, and the miracle was attributed to St. Charbel.

That occurrence, Father Matar said, has true meaning to any person seeking faith or a deeper relationship with God. Devotion to Charbel is not merely superstition, he said, but a means of connecting with God through Charbel’s intercession. “People are different. Even those who come for a miracle—but what is a miracle? Something you can see to move you on the right path,” Father Matar said.

A child is brought to the shrine of St. Charbel.(photo by Jennifer Scroggins)
Of course, in a country like Lebanon, Charbel’s spiritual and religious importance easily could be applied in the social and political realms.

As with Elias, Charbel is a rallying point for beliefs and practices universal among various creeds.

“We should live in a society where we all believe in Commandments that are common to everyone,” Father Matar said. “That could unite all of us.”

And wouldn’t that be a glorious miracle?


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Andrew Dung-Lac and Companions: Andrew Dung-Lac was one of 117 people martyred in Vietnam between 1820 and 1862. Members of this group were beatified on four different occasions between 1900 and 1951. All were canonized by St. John Paul II. 
<p>Christianity came to Vietnam (then three separate kingdoms) through the Portuguese. Jesuits opened the first permanent mission at Da Nang in 1615. They ministered to Japanese Catholics who had been driven from Japan. </p><p>The king of one of the kingdoms banned all foreign missionaries and tried to make all Vietnamese deny their faith by trampling on a crucifix. Like the priest-holes in Ireland during English persecution, many hiding places were offered in homes of the faithful. </p><p>Severe persecutions were again launched three times in the 19th century. During the six decades after 1820, between 100,000 and 300,000 Catholics were killed or subjected to great hardship. Foreign missionaries martyred in the first wave included priests of the Paris Mission Society, and Spanish Dominican priests and tertiaries. </p><p>Persecution broke out again in 1847 when the emperor suspected foreign missionaries and Vietnamese Christians of sympathizing with a rebellion led by of one of his sons. </p><p>The last of the martyrs were 17 laypersons, one of them a 9-year-old, executed in 1862. That year a treaty with France guaranteed religious freedom to Catholics, but it did not stop all persecution. </p><p>By 1954 there were over a million and a half Catholics—about seven percent of the population—in the north. Buddhists represented about 60 percent. Persistent persecution forced some 670,000 Catholics to abandon lands, homes and possessions and flee to the south. In 1964, there were still 833,000 Catholics in the north, but many were in prison. In the south, Catholics were enjoying the first decade of religious freedom in centuries, their numbers swelled by refugees. </p><p>During the Vietnamese war, Catholics again suffered in the north, and again moved to the south in great numbers. Now the whole country is under Communist rule.</p> American Catholic Blog To replace our sins with virtues may seem like a daunting task, but fortunately we can follow the example of the saints who have 
successfully defeated these sins in their lifetimes. They provide us with a way forward so that we, too, can live holy, virtuous lives.


 
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