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St. Clare was one of the early followers of St. Francis of Assisi. In 2012 the Franciscan family celebrates the 800th anniversary of Clare's decision to leave her family for a life of poverty and ministry.

Seasonal Features
St. Clare of Assisi


from Saint of the Day

Contemporary accounts glow with admiration of her life in the convent of San Damiano in Assisi. She served the sick, waited on table, washed the feet of the begging nuns. She came from prayer, it was said, with her face so shining it dazzled those about her. She suffered serious illness for the last 27 years of her life. Her influence was such that popes, cardinals and bishops often came to consult her—she never left the walls of San Damiano. Click here to read the full account.

Fr. Greg Friedman, O.F.M. reflects on the life of St. Clare:



Honoring St. Clare of Assisi
from Friar Jack's E-spirations

It was August 11, 1993. I had just taken lunch at St. Francis Friary, our Franciscan headquarters across the street from the St. Anthony Messenger Press building. I have worked as an editor and writer there for many years. After lunch, I stopped to say a prayer in the friary chapel. At the foot of the altar, I noticed a picture of Sts. Francis and Clare of Assisi standing together. The picture had been placed there because of St. Clare’s feast. Click here to read the full article.

Celebrating St. Clare of Assisi
Sister Claire André Gagliardi, O.S.C.

Within each of us is the potential to be a light focusing attention on God's presence in our world. Clare of Assisi's life reveals just how much light she shed. As a friend and as cofounder of the Franciscan movement, she supported Francis as he discerned God's message for himself and his followers. Together with her sisters, she wrote the first Rule written for religious women by a woman. She modeled the ability for the authority or power of a group to be held by the entire group. Click here to read the article from St. Anthony Messenger

Clare's Lesson
Excerpt from To Live as Francis Lived: A Guide for Secular Franciscans,
by Leonard Foley, O.F.M., Jovian Weigel, O.F.M., and Patti Normile, S.F.O.


What does Clare teach us about following Jesus? She teaches us to follow Francis, who followed Jesus so perfectly and so literally in pursuit of poverty, desiring nothing more than the Lord. Clare teaches us that we can be committed faithful followers of Francis and of Jesus while doing it in our own unique way in accord with our circumstances in life. Click here to read the excerpt.


Find more about St. Clare, St. Francis and other Franciscan resources in the Franciscan Media online catalog.


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Benedict Joseph Labre: Benedict Joseph Labre was truly eccentric, one of God's special little ones. Born in France and the eldest of 18 children, he studied under his uncle, a parish priest. Because of poor health and a lack of suitable academic preparation he was unsuccessful in his attempts to enter the religious life. Then, at 16 years of age, a profound change took place. Benedict lost his desire to study and gave up all thoughts of the priesthood, much to the consternation of his relatives. 
<p>He became a pilgrim, traveling from one great shrine to another, living off alms. He wore the rags of a beggar and shared his food with the poor. Filled with the love of God and neighbor, Benedict had special devotion to the Blessed Mother and to the Blessed Sacrament. In Rome, where he lived in the Colosseum for a time, he was called "the poor man of the Forty Hours Devotion" and "the beggar of Rome." The people accepted his ragged appearance better than he did. His excuse to himself was that "our comfort is not in this world." </p><p>On the last day of his life, April 16, 1783, Benedict Joseph dragged himself to a church in Rome and prayed there for two hours before he collapsed, dying peacefully in a nearby house. Immediately after his death the people proclaimed him a saint. </p><p>He was officially proclaimed a saint by Pope Leo XIII at canonization ceremonies in 1883.</p> American Catholic Blog Today offers limitless possibilities for holiness. Lean into His grace. The only thing keeping us from sainthood is ourselves.

 
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CATHOLIC GREETINGS
Holy Thursday
The Church remembers today both the institution of the Eucharist and our mandate to service.
Wednesday of Holy Week
Today join Catholics around the world in offering prayers for our Pope Emeritus on his 87th birthday.
Tuesday of Holy Week
Today keep in prayer all the priests and ministers throughout the world who will preside at Holy Week services.
Monday of Holy Week
Holy Week reminds us of the price Jesus paid for our salvation. Take time for prayer at home and at church.
Palm Sunday
Holy Week services and prayers invite us to follow Jesus into Jerusalem, experiencing the events of his passion and death.



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