August 2005 marks the end of World War II 60 years ago. Read about the men and women who served during the war, the World War II Memorial in Washington, D.C., the nuclear attacks on Hiroshima and Nagasaki, and Edith Stein, the Catholic saint killed by the Nazis because of her Jewish heritage. Also, make a pledge to work for peace in the world.

An infantry scene is shown in bronze relief at the new National World War II Memorial in Washington. (CNS photo by Paul Haring)
An infantry scene is shown in bronze relief at the new National World War II Memorial in Washington. (CNS photo by Paul Haring)
 
World War II ended 60 years ago. Read about the new memorial in Washington, D.C., and the memories of the men and women who served in the war in this St. Anthony Messenger article.
 
Web Exclusive: This expanded version of a sidebar featured in the September 2005 issue of St. Anthony Messenger provides a detailed look at the magazine's articles, art and advertisements during World War II.
 
Sister Teresa Benedicta of the Cross was killed by Nazis at Auschwitz because of her Jewish heritage. Is canonizing a Jew-turned-Catholic an insult to Judaism? Some Jewish people think so. The tragedy of the Holocaust is so great that efforts to memorialize Edith Stein’s death at Auschwitz have been controversial. What did her life and death mean?
 
The U.S. Holocaust Memorial Museum, dedicated in 1993, has become a popular tourist attraction in Washington, D.C. This innovative museum puts faces on the six million Jews and five million other victims killed in the Holocaust and suggests some reasons why the Holocaust happened.
 
The human race got its first taste of nuclear war in Hiroshima in 1945. Can a closer look at what the people suffered there—along with their current pleas for nuclear disarmament—wake us up in time to avert a global disaster?
 
Physically, Hiroshima has been completely rebuilt. Emotionally, however, those who experienced the bombing are haunted by depressing memories of unbelievable horror and suffering.
 
The world has never been the same since the first A-bomb was dropped on Hiroshima, Japan, 60 years ago. An American Franciscan priest visited the city to reflect on that horrendous event. What he heard was a heartfelt message of peace.
 
Because thousands of Catholics were among the 70,000 destroyed in the A-bomb blast at Nagasaki, that city has been called “the place where Christianity first faced the bomb.” Thanks to Pope John Paul II’s visit to Japan, Nagasaki Catholics are moving from a passive, martyrlike attitude toward the bomb to more active involvement in the struggle for peace.
 
 
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