AmericanCatholic.org
 
Skip Navigation Links
Home
Catholic News
Saints
Seasonal
Special Reports
Movies
Shopping
Donate
Share:
Facebook
Twitter
Google Plus
LinkedIn
Email
RSS Feeds
Daily Catholic Question

What are the sacraments?

We have been taught that there are seven sacraments: Baptism, Confirmation, Eucharist, Reconciliation, Anointing of the Sick, Marriage and Holy Orders. When people today hear that Jesus is a sacrament and the Church is a sacrament they sometimes wonder, Does that makes nine sacraments? The question "How many sacraments are there?" has received different answers at various periods of our history depending on what the question meant and how the questioner understood the word sacrament.

In our industrial America assigning qualities to numbers as symbols (for instance, thinking "13" is unlucky) usually sounds strange or superstitious. But this use is quite common in other societies and other historical periods. Numbers as qualities have often been used in religion. Seven, for example, symbolizes totality. This is an important factor in the Church's speaking of seven sacraments.

Four is the number for earth and three is the number for heaven. (There are four elements: earth, air, fire and water. There are three Persons in God.) When we join earth and heaven, the material and the spiritual, the created and the divine, four and three, we have "all that is." And so, seven means universal, completeness, totality. When we say that there are seven sacraments we are suggesting in this religious sense that the material universe is a sacrament; all created things are windows to the divine; we have all the sacraments we will ever need! (Seven is frequently used in this sense of "completeness": There are "seven gifts" of the Holy Spirit and there are "seven Churches" in the Book of Revelation, symbolizing the universal Church.)

For the first 11 centuries of Christian history the word sacrament was frequently used to refer to the mysterious plan of God. Little by little specific aspects of this mysterious plan-for example, eucharist, baptism, anointing of the sick-began to be singled out and called sacraments. In the 12th century, we began to see the list of the seven actions which we now call sacraments. In 1547, responding to specific questions being asked at the time, the Council of Trent stated: "The sacraments of the new law are seven, no more and no less" (Session VII, Canon 1).


Click here for the rest of today's answer

Friday, September 6, 2013
Daily Catholic Question for 9/5/2013 Daily Catholic Question for 9/7/2013


Emmanuel Ruiz and Companions: Not much is known of the early life of Emmanuel Ruiz, but details of his heroic death in defense of the faith have come down to us.
<p>Born of humble parents in Santander, Spain, he became a Franciscan priest and served as a missionary in Damascus. This was at a time when anti-Christian riots shook Syria and thousands lost their lives in just a short time.</p><p>Among these were Emmanuel, superior of the Franciscan convent, seven other friars and three laymen. When a menacing crowd came looking for the men, they refused to renounce their faith and become Muslims. The men were subjected to horrible tortures before their martyrdom.</p><p>Emmanuel, his brother Franciscans and the three Maronite laymen were beatified in 1926 by Pope Pius XI.</p> American Catholic Blog Lord, your mother gave us the rosary to save us from the evil world. Help us to spread her devotion. Help us to honor her request that we pray the rosary. Help us meditate on your life and the grace of salvation you bring us.

The Blessing of Family

 
CATHOLIC GREETINGS
Confirmation
Is someone you know preparing to receive this sacrament? An e-card is a quick reminder of your prayers.

Blessed Teresa of Calcutta
Blessed Teresa's example inspires us to see Jesus in everyone we meet. Remember her today with a Catholic Greetings e-card.

Back to School
We ask God to bless their school year with friendships, wisdom and peace.

Happy Birthday
Every day is somebody’s birthday and a good reason to celebrate!

Labor Day (U.S.)
Creator God, we praise you for our work and for your work of creation. Bless us today and always.




Come find us at: Facebook | St. Anthony Messenger magazine Twitter | American Catholic YouTube | American Catholic


An AmericanCatholic.org Site from the Franciscans and Franciscan Media Copyright © 1996 - 2015