AmericanCatholic.org
 
Skip Navigation Links
Home
Catholic News
Saints
Seasonal
Special Reports
Movies
Shopping
Donate
Share:
Facebook
Twitter
Google Plus
LinkedIn
Email
RSS Feeds
Daily Catholic Question

Did I make my son gay?

I think the best science today answers your question with a resounding “no.” If your son is indeed homosexually oriented, that is not anyone’s decision—not even his. Most experts in this field deny that any therapy can change a person’s true sexual orientation.

The U.S. bishops’ Committee on Marriage and Family has written Always Our Children: A Pastoral Message to Parents of Homosexual Children and Suggestions for Pastoral Ministers (Publication 5-131 in English and 5-130 in Spanish). Your local parish may have a copy. It is available from the U.S. Catholic Conference for $1.25, plus 10 percent shipping and handling ($3 minimum). Call toll-free 800-235-8722 or visit www.nccbuscc.org.

Our Catholic Update titled “What the Church Teaches About Homosexuality,” by Richard Sparks, C.S.P., (C0799) can also be ordered either online or by calling 1-800-488-0488.

Click here for the rest of today's answer

Wednesday, September 4, 2013
Daily Catholic Question for 9/3/2013 Daily Catholic Question for 9/5/2013


Th&eacute;r&egrave;se of Lisieux: "I prefer the monotony of obscure sacrifice to all ecstasies. To pick up a pin for love can convert a soul." These are the words of Thérèse of the Child Jesus, a Carmelite nun called the "Little Flower," who lived a cloistered life of obscurity in the convent of Lisieux, France. (In French-speaking areas, she is known as Thérèse of Lisieux.) And her preference for hidden sacrifice did indeed convert souls. Few saints of God are more popular than this young nun. Her autobiography, <i>The Story of a Soul</i>, is read and loved throughout the world. Thérèse Martin entered the convent at the age of 15 and died in 1897 at the age of 24. She was canonized in 1925, and two years later she and St. Francis Xavier were declared co-patrons of the missions. 
<p>Life in a Carmelite convent is indeed uneventful and consists mainly of prayer and hard domestic work. But Thérèse possessed that holy insight that redeems the time, however dull that time may be. She saw in quiet suffering redemptive suffering, suffering that was indeed her apostolate. Thérèse said she came to the Carmel convent "to save souls and pray for priests." And shortly before she died, she wrote: "I want to spend my heaven doing good on earth." </p><p>On October 19, 1997, Saint John Paul II proclaimed her a Doctor of the Church, the third woman to be so recognized, in light of her holiness and the influence on the Church of her teaching on spirituality. Her parents, Louis and Zélie were beatified in 2008.</p> American Catholic Blog How glorious, how holy and wonderful it is to have a Father in Heaven.

 
PICKS OF THE WEEK
Mother Teresa's Insights
Enjoy this collection of short stories, prayers, and meditations straight from the heart of Mother Teresa.
Seek St. Kateri's Intercession

Discover Emily Cavins's skill in weaving together historical facts into the compelling story of Kateri's path to sainthood.

He's BAAACK!
Saint picks up where Sinner left off. Always hilarious and brutally honest, Lino is now ready for his canonization!
New from Richard Rohr!
This comprehensive collection features  Rohr's meditations for each day of the year.
What Is the Breviary?
Learn about the daily prayer of the Universal Church, the Liturgy of the Hours, in this handy guidebook.

 
CATHOLIC GREETINGS
Back to School
We ask God to bless their school year with friendships, wisdom and peace.
Happy Birthday
Every day is somebody’s birthday and a good reason to celebrate!
Labor Day (U.S.)
Creator God, we praise you for our work and for your work of creation. Bless us today and always.
Labor Day (U.S.)
As we thank God for the blessing of work we also pray for those less fortunate than ourselves.
Wedding
"May the Father, Son and Holy Spirit bless you in good times and in bad…"



Come find us at: Facebook | St. Anthony Messenger magazine Twitter | American Catholic YouTube | American Catholic


An AmericanCatholic.org Site from the Franciscans and Franciscan Media Copyright © 1996 - 2014