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Daily Catholic Question

How should we clean up after the chalice is spilled?

Number 239 of the General Instruction on the Roman Missal (in front of the Sacramentary) states, "If any of the precious blood spills, the area should be washed and the water poured into the sacrarium." So, too, should the purificators used to cleanse chalices, patens and ciboria be washed in the sacrarium and the water drained into the earth.

The sacrarium is special because it drains directly into the soil underneath the church rather than into a common drain. If there should be no sacrarium, water from these washings may be poured on clean earth in the garden where it will not be stepped on. After the first washing these cloths may be allowed to dry and then washed in a normal way.

For more about what to do in the case of accidents with the eucharistic elements, see the Appendix in Ceremonies of the Modern Roman Rite, by Msgr. Peter J. Elliot (Ignatius Press).

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Sunday, September 30, 2012
Daily Catholic Question for 9/29/2012 Daily Catholic Question for 10/1/2012


Mary Magdalene: Except for the mother of Jesus, few women are more honored in the Bible than Mary Magdalene. Yet she could well be the patron of the slandered, since there has been a persistent legend in the Church that she is the unnamed sinful woman who anointed the feet of Jesus in Luke 7:36-50. 
<p>Most Scripture scholars today point out that there is no scriptural basis for confusing the two women. Mary Magdalene, that is, “of Magdala,” was the one from whom Christ cast out “seven demons” (Luke 8:2)—an indication, at the worst, of extreme demonic possession or, possibly, severe illness. </p><p>Father Wilfrid J. Harrington, O.P., writing in the <i>New Catholic Commentary</i>, says that “seven demons” “does not mean that Mary had lived an immoral life—a conclusion reached only by means of a mistaken identification with the anonymous woman of Luke 7:36.” Father Edward Mally, S.J., writing in the <i>Jerome Biblical Commentary,</i> agrees that she “is not...the same as the sinner of Luke 7:37, despite the later Western romantic tradition about her.” </p><p>Mary Magdalene was one of the many “who were assisting them [Jesus and the Twelve] out of their means.” She was one of those who stood by the cross of Jesus with his mother. And, of all the “official” witnesses that might have been chosen for the first awareness of the Resurrection, she was the one to whom that privilege was given. She is known as the "Apostle to the Apostles."</p> American Catholic Blog Jesus does not save us as individuals, but as members of His Body. We are not just people—unconnected and isolated arms and legs. We are a people—in fact, the People of God.

 
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