AmericanCatholic.org
 
Skip Navigation Links
Home
Catholic News
Saints
Seasonal
Special Reports
Movies
Shopping
Donate
Share:
Facebook
Twitter
Google Plus
LinkedIn
Email
RSS Feeds
Daily Catholic Question

Why do we receive palms on Palm Sunday?

In general, the palm is a symbol of victory and triumph. It is associated with the rejoicing that comes with victory. Thus saints, especially martyrs, are often depicted carrying the palm of victory—they have triumphed over sin and won the victory of heaven.

All the Gospels recall the triumphant entry of Jesus into Jerusalem before his passion and death. The Gospels tell us that the crowds lined the road welcoming Jesus to the city. And they laid branches from the trees or reeds on the road before Jesus. John recalls, "...they took palm branches and went out to meet him, and cried out, ‘Hosanna! Blessed is he who comes in the name of the Lord...’"(12:13).

In the first part of the liturgy on Passion (Palm) Sunday we commemorate and reenact Jesus’ triumphant entry into Jerusalem. Palms are blessed and given to those present to carry in procession.

In the blessing of palms the priest prays, "Today we honor Christ our triumphant King by carrying these branches. May we honor you every day by living always in him."

Click here for the rest of today's answer

Tuesday, September 3, 2013
Daily Catholic Question for 9/2/2013 Daily Catholic Question for 9/4/2013


All Saints: The earliest certain observance of a feast in honor of all the saints is an early fourth-century commemoration of "all the martyrs." In the early seventh century, after successive waves of invaders plundered the catacombs, Pope Boniface IV gathered up some 28 wagonloads of bones and reinterred them beneath the Pantheon, a Roman temple dedicated to all the gods. The pope rededicated the shrine as a Christian church. According to Venerable Bede, the pope intended "that the memory of all the saints might in the future be honored in the place which had formerly been dedicated to the worship not of gods but of demons" (<i>On the Calculation of Time</i>). 
<p>But the rededication of the Pantheon, like the earlier commemoration of all the martyrs, occurred in May. Many Eastern Churches still honor all the saints in the spring, either during the Easter season or immediately after Pentecost. </p><p>How the Western Church came to celebrate this feast, now recognized as a solemnity, in November is a puzzle to historians. The Anglo-Saxon theologian Alcuin observed the feast on November 1 in 800, as did his friend Arno, Bishop of Salzburg. Rome finally adopted that date in the ninth century.</p> American Catholic Blog Touch can be an act of kindness when someone is dying. If you visit a sick person and find that you are at a loss for words, reach out and touch her hand.

 
PICKS OF THE WEEK
Mother Teresa's Insights
Enjoy this collection of short stories, prayers, and meditations straight from the heart of Mother Teresa.
Seek St. Kateri's Intercession

Discover Emily Cavins's skill in weaving together historical facts into the compelling story of Kateri's path to sainthood.

He's BAAACK!
Saint picks up where Sinner left off. Always hilarious and brutally honest, Lino is now ready for his canonization!
New from Richard Rohr!
This comprehensive collection features  Rohr's meditations for each day of the year.
What Is the Breviary?
Learn about the daily prayer of the Universal Church, the Liturgy of the Hours, in this handy guidebook.

 
CATHOLIC GREETINGS
Happy Birthday
Every day is somebody’s birthday and a good reason to celebrate!
Labor Day (U.S.)
Creator God, we praise you for our work and for your work of creation. Bless us today and always.
Labor Day (U.S.)
As we thank God for the blessing of work we also pray for those less fortunate than ourselves.
Wedding
"May the Father, Son and Holy Spirit bless you in good times and in bad…"
Friendship
Reconnect with your BFF. Send an e-card to arrange a meal together.



Come find us at: Facebook | St. Anthony Messenger magazine Twitter | American Catholic YouTube | American Catholic


An AmericanCatholic.org Site from the Franciscans and Franciscan Media Copyright © 1996 - 2014