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Daily Catholic Question

What good is the Church to us?

Her question was blunt: "What good is the Church to us?" I flinched but another teen answered without skipping a beat, "It's community. Like when you're in trouble, it's where you can be and be safe." This seemed to me a very Catholic response.

Life is better when it is shared. As the Bible puts it, "It is not good for the man [or the woman] to be alone" (Genesis 2:18). What goes for life in general also goes for our life of faith.

You need someone to stand by you in the difficult moments when you doubt. You need people to support you but also to challenge you to be better and brighter and more faithful. Somebody has to be there to teach and guide when you have questions and are seeking. Somebody has to pass on the faith.

Most people have not seen God. Just about the closest you can get is seeing God in other people. When a friend puts her hand on your shoulder, when a teacher challenges you to be more than you thought you could be, this is God at work through them. When a priest in confession tells you that awful thing you did is forgiven, when someone in your youth group tells you that you are loved, that is God's word being spoken by members of the Church.


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Wednesday, August 6, 2014
Daily Catholic Question for 8/5/2014 Daily Catholic Question for 8/7/2014


Th&eacute;r&egrave;se of Lisieux: "I prefer the monotony of obscure sacrifice to all ecstasies. To pick up a pin for love can convert a soul." These are the words of Thérèse of the Child Jesus, a Carmelite nun called the "Little Flower," who lived a cloistered life of obscurity in the convent of Lisieux, France. (In French-speaking areas, she is known as Thérèse of Lisieux.) And her preference for hidden sacrifice did indeed convert souls. Few saints of God are more popular than this young nun. Her autobiography, <i>The Story of a Soul</i>, is read and loved throughout the world. Thérèse Martin entered the convent at the age of 15 and died in 1897 at the age of 24. She was canonized in 1925, and two years later she and St. Francis Xavier were declared co-patrons of the missions. 
<p>Life in a Carmelite convent is indeed uneventful and consists mainly of prayer and hard domestic work. But Thérèse possessed that holy insight that redeems the time, however dull that time may be. She saw in quiet suffering redemptive suffering, suffering that was indeed her apostolate. Thérèse said she came to the Carmel convent "to save souls and pray for priests." And shortly before she died, she wrote: "I want to spend my heaven doing good on earth." </p><p>On October 19, 1997, Saint John Paul II proclaimed her a Doctor of the Church, the third woman to be so recognized, in light of her holiness and the influence on the Church of her teaching on spirituality. Her parents, Louis and Zélie were beatified in 2008.</p> American Catholic Blog How glorious, how holy and wonderful it is to have a Father in Heaven.

 
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