AmericanCatholic.org
 
Skip Navigation Links
Home
Catholic News
Saints
Seasonal
Special Reports
Movies
Shopping
Donate
Share:
Facebook
Twitter
Google Plus
LinkedIn
Email
RSS Feeds
Daily Catholic Question

How can a person discern a religious vocation?

These questions may help you get in touch with good choices you will want to consider.

  • How would you describe your relationship with Jesus?
  • What makes you most happy at this point in your life? How do you share that with others?

  • How are you involved in a parish community or youth group?
  • Who or what supports you in trying to be the best person you can be?
  • How are you of service to others?.
  • What are you doing right now to help you decide your future?
  • Many possible answers to these questions are "right." Eavesdrop on your own answers to hear what makes you happy, what gives you energy, what direction you've already taken. Some answers may suggest a movement toward priesthood or religious life. Such answers may lead to further questions. Ask those questions of a priest, brother or religious sister—soon!

    Research indicates that the number one reason people fail to consider priesthood or religious life as an option is because no one ever invited them to do so. It isn't for everyone, but it could be for you or for one of your friends. So I'm inviting you to find out more about this possibility.

    I dare you to consider it! It just might change your life and the lives of others as well.


    Click here for the rest of today's answer

    Sunday, July 7, 2013
    Daily Catholic Question for 7/6/2013 Daily Catholic Question for 7/8/2013


    Thomas Aquinas: By universal consent, Thomas Aquinas is the preeminent spokesman of the Catholic tradition of reason and of divine revelation. He is one of the great teachers of the medieval Catholic Church, honored with the titles Doctor of the Church and Angelic Doctor. 
<p>At five he was given to the Benedictine monastery at Monte Cassino in his parents’ hopes that he would choose that way of life and eventually became abbot. In 1239 he was sent to Naples to complete his studies. It was here that he was first attracted to Aristotle’s philosophy. </p><p>By 1243, Thomas abandoned his family’s plans for him and joined the Dominicans, much to his mother’s dismay. On her order, Thomas was captured by his brother and kept at home for over a year. </p><p>Once free, he went to Paris and then to Cologne, where he finished his studies with Albert the Great. He held two professorships at Paris, lived at the court of Pope Urban IV, directed the Dominican schools at Rome and Viterbo, combated adversaries of the mendicants, as well as the Averroists, and argued with some Franciscans about Aristotelianism. </p><p>His greatest contribution to the Catholic Church is his writings. The unity, harmony and continuity of faith and reason, of revealed and natural human knowledge, pervades his writings. One might expect Thomas, as a man of the gospel, to be an ardent defender of revealed truth. But he was broad enough, deep enough, to see the whole natural order as coming from God the Creator, and to see reason as a divine gift to be highly cherished. </p><p>The <i>Summa Theologiae</i>, his last and, unfortunately, uncompleted work, deals with the whole of Catholic theology. He stopped work on it after celebrating Mass on December 6, 1273. When asked why he stopped writing, he replied, “I cannot go on.... All that I have written seems to me like so much straw compared to what I have seen and what has been revealed to me.” He died March 7, 1274.</p> American Catholic Blog We talk often about how we are God’s “hands and feet,” which is true. That being said, we can’t fall into the trap of thinking God needs us like we need Him. He’s God—which makes the reality that He wants to use us and be in a relationship with us an even sweeter, more profound truth.

     
    PICKS OF THE WEEK
    Help for Home Schoolers and All Parents
    Prepare for a fruitful year with your children.
    Catholic Prayer

    Stay in touch with God every day with this classic prayer book.

    Life Lessons

    Help your children choose warm places.

    Summer Fun!
    It's a challenge to keep kids' skills sharp during the summer break. Pete (and Repeat) can help!
    Liturgy of the Hours
     Daria Sockey provides a solid overview to this ancient prayer practice.

     
    CATHOLIC GREETINGS
    Mary's Flower - Rose
    Mary, center us as you were centered.
    Vacation
    Keep the holiday spirit and send an e-card to schedule another summer cookout!
    Independence Day (U.S.)
    Happy Independence Day from Catholic Greetings and AmericanCatholic.org!
    Name Day
    No e-card for their patron? Don't worry, a name day greeting fills the bill!
    Birthday
    God of birthdays, we light these candles in honor of this child, who has been your light and gift to others.



    Come find us at: Facebook | St. Anthony Messenger magazine Twitter | American Catholic YouTube | American Catholic


    An AmericanCatholic.org Site from the Franciscans and Franciscan Media Copyright © 1996 - 2015