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Daily Catholic Question

What is Confirmation all about?

Sometimes words aren't enough. Sometimes it's not enough just to tell your mom, "I'm sorry." It may take a hug as well. Sometimes it's not enough to say, "Thank you" or "I love you."

You might give a gift. Such a special gift can become more than just the object given. It can become a reminder of the one who gave the gift. It can become even more than a reminder: it can become a symbol. It can evoke the presence of the giver, the occasion when it was given, the feelings that ,came with the gift.

Sacraments are like that, too. Sacramental symbols can say more than words alone because, while words speak to our mind, symbols speak to our whole body.

Words may be able to explain what happens at Confirmation and what it means to be confirmed. But we really don't "know" what Confirmation is until we experience the ritual symbols of the sacrament. The principal symbols of the Sacrament of Confirmation are seven:

  • Community
  • Baptism
  • Anointing
  • Touch
  • Words
  • The Minister
  • Eucharist
The full text of this Youth Update explains each of these seven symbols.

Click here for the rest of today's answer

Thursday, July 11, 2013
Daily Catholic Question for 7/10/2013 Daily Catholic Question for 7/12/2013


Hilarion: Despite his best efforts to live in prayer and solitude, today’s saint found it difficult to achieve his deepest desire. People were naturally drawn to Hilarion as a source of spiritual wisdom and peace. He had reached such fame by the time of his death that his body had to be secretly removed so that a shrine would not be built in his honor. Instead, he was buried in his home village. 
<p>St. Hilarion the Great, as he is sometimes called, was born in Palestine. After his conversion to Christianity he spent some time with St. Anthony of Egypt, another holy man drawn to solitude. Hilarion lived a life of hardship and simplicity in the desert, where he also experienced spiritual dryness that included temptations to despair. At the same time, miracles were attributed to him. </p><p>As his fame grew, a small group of disciples wanted to follow Hilarion. He began a series of journeys to find a place where he could live away from the world. He finally settled on Cyprus, where he died in 371 at about age 80. </p><p>Hilarion is celebrated as the founder of monasticism in Palestine. Much of his fame flows from the biography of him written by St. Jerome.</p> American Catholic Blog Therefore if any thought agitates you, this agitation never comes from God, who gives you peace, being the Spirit of Peace, but from the devil.

 
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