AmericanCatholic.org
 
Skip Navigation Links
Home
Catholic News
Saints
Seasonal
Special Reports
Movies
Shopping
Donate
Share:
Facebook
Twitter
Google Plus
LinkedIn
Email
RSS Feeds
Daily Catholic Question

What is Confirmation all about?

Sometimes words aren't enough. Sometimes it's not enough just to tell your mom, "I'm sorry." It may take a hug as well. Sometimes it's not enough to say, "Thank you" or "I love you."

You might give a gift. Such a special gift can become more than just the object given. It can become a reminder of the one who gave the gift. It can become even more than a reminder: it can become a symbol. It can evoke the presence of the giver, the occasion when it was given, the feelings that ,came with the gift.

Sacraments are like that, too. Sacramental symbols can say more than words alone because, while words speak to our mind, symbols speak to our whole body.

Words may be able to explain what happens at Confirmation and what it means to be confirmed. But we really don't "know" what Confirmation is until we experience the ritual symbols of the sacrament. The principal symbols of the Sacrament of Confirmation are seven:

  • Community
  • Baptism
  • Anointing
  • Touch
  • Words
  • The Minister
  • Eucharist
The full text of this Youth Update explains each of these seven symbols.

Click here for the rest of today's answer

Thursday, July 11, 2013
Daily Catholic Question for 7/10/2013 Daily Catholic Question for 7/12/2013


Conversion of St. Paul: Paul’s entire life can be explained in terms of one experience—his meeting with Jesus on the road to Damascus. In an instant, he saw that all the zeal of his dynamic personality was being wasted, like the strength of a boxer swinging wildly. Perhaps he had never seen Jesus, who was only a few years older. But he had acquired a zealot’s hatred of all Jesus stood for, as he began to harass the Church: “...entering house after house and dragging out men and women, he handed them over for imprisonment” (Acts 8:3b). Now he himself was “entered,” possessed, all his energy harnessed to one goal—being a slave of Christ in the ministry of reconciliation, an instrument to help others experience the one Savior. 
<p>One sentence determined his theology: “I am Jesus, whom you are persecuting” (Acts 9:5b). Jesus was mysteriously identified with people—the loving group of people Saul had been running down like criminals. Jesus, he saw, was the mysterious fulfillment of all he had been blindly pursuing. </p><p>From then on, his only work was to “present everyone perfect in Christ. For this I labor and struggle, in accord with the exercise of his power working within me” (Colossians 1:28b-29). “For our gospel did not come to you in word alone, but also in power and in the Holy Spirit and [with] much conviction” (1 Thessalonians 1:5a). </p><p>Paul’s life became a tireless proclaiming and living out of the message of the cross: Christians die baptismally to sin and are buried with Christ; they are dead to all that is sinful and unredeemed in the world. They are made into a new creation, already sharing Christ’s victory and someday to rise from the dead like him. Through this risen Christ the Father pours out the Spirit on them, making them completely new. </p><p>So Paul’s great message to the world was: You are saved entirely by God, not by anything you can do. Saving faith is the gift of total, free, personal and loving commitment to Christ, a commitment that then bears fruit in more “works” than the Law could ever contemplate.</p> American Catholic Blog If you’re confused as to why God would die for you, you either need to rethink your vision of His mercy or of your own worth.

 
PICKS OF THE WEEK
Vatican II Today

Learn about Vatican II and how its many updates to the Catholic faith still influence our faith today.

Where's Jesus?

Help your child become visually adept with this delightful book!

On the Road to Sainthood
Learn about John XXIII, whose pivotal papacy ushered in the modern era of the Church.
Help for Home Schoolers and All Parents
Prepare for a fruitful year with your children.
Catholic Prayer

Stay in touch with God every day with this classic prayer book.


 
CATHOLIC GREETINGS
St. Benedict
A mark of the followers of this sixth-century saint is the warmth of their hospitality, especially toward travelers.
Summer
While you relax keep in touch with friends and family through e-cards.
Caregiver
Our lives are interwoven with one another and we are called to respond generously to those in need.
Happy Birthday
Send a birthday wish that each tomorrow of the coming year will be full of life and peace!
Mary's Flower - Rose
Mary, center us as you were centered.



Come find us at: Facebook | St. Anthony Messenger magazine Twitter | American Catholic YouTube | American Catholic


An AmericanCatholic.org Site from the Franciscans and Franciscan Media Copyright © 1996 - 2015