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Daily Catholic Question

Why should I go to Mass? Give me ten reasons.

10. Challenge yourself to find at least one idea within the Mass that makes sense and seems possible, practical, intriguing, mysterious, interesting, cool or worth thinking about in relation to your life in some way.

9. An hour's investment can result in a week's worth of better relationships at home.

8. When Jesus becomes present in the Eucharist, the entire Body of Christ is present. That includes grandparents who have died, relatives and friends who live far away and people you don't even know. This invisible cosmic reality is called the communion of saints.

7. If you pretend to agree with peers' negative opinions about attending Mass just to live up to their expectations and retain your "coolness" rating, you have caved in to peer pressure. Be unique—it's fun.

6. Your presence in church (unless, of course, you're slouched against the back wall of the church rolling your eyes) is a sign to others that you consider your faith important. That's what we all Christian witnessing or spreading the gospel.

5. If you tune into the words, especially those of the eucharistic prayer, you can make them your own. Actually say them in your mind to God as you hear them. Mean them yourself, as you say them along with the rest of the community.

4. Start a date sometimes at Mass. Going to Mass together is one of the best ways to get the feeling that you are building and strengthening a relationship, not simply skimming its surface. Knowing that your relationship is grounded in God who is relationships and who created them is a good feeling.

3. Sometimes we think Mass is for those who A) understand their faith just about perfectly and have no problems with it, and B) hold a really great, glittering Christian track record. We need to remember to bring ourselves, faults and all, to meet Jesus at Mass.

2. Mass brings you into a world and life-wide web, linking everything to Jesus and turning it to gold. Even when Mass goes well, we tend to leave it and enter an "ordinary, regular" world where things are just things, many of them a little boring, many of them not working out right. Even though we'd like to believe otherwise, we tend to feel that God is perhaps pleased and interested in the prayers we say, but that the rest of our lives are pretty much dead space as far God is concerned.

At the presentation of gifts at Mass, when two or three people bring the bread and wine up the aisle to the priest at the altar, put your week-to-come among the gifts to be transformed into Jesus and offered to our Creator. You're a baptized Christian; you have the right and the power to do so.

1. It's what Jesus asked us to do. We owe Jesus everything, and he asked us to celebrate Mass. In the end, it is just that simple.


Click here for the rest of today's answer

Wednesday, July 10, 2013
Daily Catholic Question for 7/9/2013 Daily Catholic Question for 7/11/2013


Columban: Columban was the greatest of the Irish missionaries who worked on the European continent. As a young man who was greatly tormented by temptations of the flesh, he sought the advice of a religious woman who had lived a hermit’s life for years. He saw in her answer a call to leave the world. He went first to a monk on an island in Lough Erne, then to the great monastic seat of learning at Bangor. 
<p>After many years of seclusion and prayer, he traveled to Gaul (modern-day France) with 12 companion missionaries. They won wide respect for the rigor of their discipline, their preaching, and their commitment to charity and religious life in a time characterized by clerical laxity and civil strife. Columban established several monasteries in Europe which became centers of religion and culture. </p><p>Like all saints, he met opposition. Ultimately he had to appeal to the pope against complaints of Frankish bishops, for vindication of his orthodoxy and approval of Irish customs. He reproved the king for his licentious life, insisting that he marry. Since this threatened the power of the queen mother, Columban was deported to Ireland. His ship ran aground in a storm, and he continued his work in Europe, ultimately arriving in Italy, where he found favor with the king of the Lombards. In his last years he established the famous monastery of Bobbio, where he died. His writings include a treatise on penance and against Arianism, sermons, poetry and his monastic rule.</p> American Catholic Blog There are not a hundred people in America who hate the Catholic Church. There are millions of people who hate what they wrongly believe to be the Catholic Church—which is, of course, quite a different thing. –Bishop Fulton Sheen

 
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