AmericanCatholic.org
 
Skip Navigation Links
Home
Catholic News
Saints
Seasonal
Special Reports
Movies
Shopping
Donate
Share:
Facebook
Twitter
Google Plus
LinkedIn
Email
RSS Feeds
Daily Catholic Question

Can Catholics reserve the Eucharist in their home?

By canon law the Blessed Sacrament must be reserved in cathedral and parish churches, and in churches or oratories attached to the houses of religious institutes.

The Eucharist may be reserved in a bishop’s chapel and, with permission of the local ordinary (usually a bishop), in other churches, oratories and chapels.

The law in all cases requires that the sacrament be kept in a church, chapel or oratory. And there are other requirements about a fixed and solid tabernacle.

The law also requires that someone be responsible for the custody and care of the Blessed Sacrament, and that a priest celebrate Mass at the place of reservation with some frequency. That is to make sure the hosts do not age and become stale or moldy.

Notice, the law does not permit reservation of the sacrament in private homes. The purpose of reserving the Eucharist is to have the Blessed Sacrament available as viaticum for those near death, Communion outside of Mass and adoration of the Lord present in the Eucharist.

Reservation in private homes does not very well fit those purposes, and it is difficult to guarantee the Sacrament will be treated with proper respect.

Click here for the rest of today's answer

Wednesday, May 15, 2013
Daily Catholic Question for 5/14/2013 Daily Catholic Question for 5/16/2013


Casimir: Casimir, born of kings and in line (third among 13 children) to be a king himself, was filled with exceptional values and learning by a great teacher, John Dlugosz. Even his critics could not say that his conscientious objection indicated softness. Even as a teenager, Casimir lived a highly disciplined, even severe life, sleeping on the ground, spending a great part of the night in prayer and dedicating himself to lifelong celibacy. 
<p>When nobles in Hungary became dissatisfied with their king, they prevailed upon Casimir’s father, the king of Poland, to send his son to take over the country. Casimir obeyed his father, as many young men over the centuries have obeyed their government. The army he was supposed to lead was clearly outnumbered by the “enemy”; some of his troops were deserting because they were not paid. At the advice of his officers, Casimir decided to return home. </p><p>His father was irked at the failure of his plans, and confined his 15-year-old son for three months. The lad made up his mind never again to become involved in the wars of his day, and no amount of persuasion could change his mind. He returned to prayer and study, maintaining his decision to remain celibate even under pressure to marry the emperor’s daughter. </p><p>He reigned briefly as king of Poland during his father’s absence. He died of lung trouble at 23 while visiting Lithuania, of which he was also Grand Duke. He was buried in Vilnius, Lithuania.</p> American Catholic Blog We renew and deepen our dedication to God and express that by sacrificing something meaningful to us. But as we go about our fasting and almsgiving, let’s not forget to give him some extra time in prayer.


 
CATHOLIC GREETINGS
St. Isidore the Farmer
This deeply religious 12th-century husband and father was known for his love of the poor.

Easter Weekday
We continue to rejoice in the knowledge that the Resurrection is not just in the past, but is an ongoing reality.

Our Lady of Fatima
Our model of discipleship is also one whom we call Mother. Share your devotion with an e-card.

Mother's Day
Happy Mother’s Day from Catholic Greetings and AmericanCatholic.org!

Mother's Day
Happy Mother's Day from Catholic Greetings and AmericanCatholic.org!




Come find us at: Facebook | St. Anthony Messenger magazine Twitter | American Catholic YouTube | American Catholic


An AmericanCatholic.org Site from the Franciscans and Franciscan Media Copyright © 1996 - 2015