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Daily Catholic Question

Can Catholics reserve the Eucharist in their home?

By canon law the Blessed Sacrament must be reserved in cathedral and parish churches, and in churches or oratories attached to the houses of religious institutes.

The Eucharist may be reserved in a bishop’s chapel and, with permission of the local ordinary (usually a bishop), in other churches, oratories and chapels.

The law in all cases requires that the sacrament be kept in a church, chapel or oratory. And there are other requirements about a fixed and solid tabernacle.

The law also requires that someone be responsible for the custody and care of the Blessed Sacrament, and that a priest celebrate Mass at the place of reservation with some frequency. That is to make sure the hosts do not age and become stale or moldy.

Notice, the law does not permit reservation of the sacrament in private homes. The purpose of reserving the Eucharist is to have the Blessed Sacrament available as viaticum for those near death, Communion outside of Mass and adoration of the Lord present in the Eucharist.

Reservation in private homes does not very well fit those purposes, and it is difficult to guarantee the Sacrament will be treated with proper respect.

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Wednesday, May 15, 2013
Daily Catholic Question for 5/14/2013 Daily Catholic Question for 5/16/2013

John Leonardi: "I am only one person! Why should I do anything? What good would it do?" Today, as in any age, people seem plagued with the dilemma of getting involved. In his own way John Leonardi answered these questions. He chose to become a priest. 
<p>After his ordination, he became very active in the works of the ministry, especially in hospitals and prisons. The example and dedication of his work attracted several young laymen who began to assist him. They later became priests themselves. </p><p>John lived after the Protestant Reformation and the Council of Trent (1545-63). He and his followers projected a new congregation of diocesan priests. For some reason the plan, which was ultimately approved, provoked great political opposition. John was exiled from his home town of Lucca, Italy, for almost the entire remainder of his life. He received encouragement and help from St. Philip Neri, who gave him his lodgings—along with the care of his cat! </p><p>In 1579, John formed the Confraternity of Christian Doctrine, and published a compendium of Christian doctrine that remained in use until the 19th century. </p><p>Father Leonardi and his priests became a great power for good in Italy, and their congregation was confirmed by Pope Clement in 1595. He died at the age of 68 from a disease caught when tending those stricken by the plague. </p><p>By the deliberate policy of the founder, the Clerks Regular of the Mother of God have never had more than 15 churches and today form only a very small congregation.</p> American Catholic Blog Be strong in the Lord and in the strength of his might. Put on the whole armor of God that you may be able to stand against the wiles of the devil. For we are not contending against flesh and blood, but against the principalities, against the powers, against the world rulers of this present darkness, against the spiritual hosts of wickedness in the heavenly places.

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