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Daily Catholic Question

Can Catholics reserve the Eucharist in their home?

By canon law the Blessed Sacrament must be reserved in cathedral and parish churches, and in churches or oratories attached to the houses of religious institutes.

The Eucharist may be reserved in a bishop’s chapel and, with permission of the local ordinary (usually a bishop), in other churches, oratories and chapels.

The law in all cases requires that the sacrament be kept in a church, chapel or oratory. And there are other requirements about a fixed and solid tabernacle.

The law also requires that someone be responsible for the custody and care of the Blessed Sacrament, and that a priest celebrate Mass at the place of reservation with some frequency. That is to make sure the hosts do not age and become stale or moldy.

Notice, the law does not permit reservation of the sacrament in private homes. The purpose of reserving the Eucharist is to have the Blessed Sacrament available as viaticum for those near death, Communion outside of Mass and adoration of the Lord present in the Eucharist.

Reservation in private homes does not very well fit those purposes, and it is difficult to guarantee the Sacrament will be treated with proper respect.

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Wednesday, May 15, 2013
Daily Catholic Question for 5/14/2013 Daily Catholic Question for 5/16/2013


Peter Chanel: Anyone who has worked in loneliness, with great adaptation required and with little apparent success, will find a kindred spirit in Peter Chanel. 
<p>As a young priest he revived a parish in a "bad" district by the simple method of showing great devotion to the sick. Wanting to be a missionary, he joined the Society of Mary (Marists) at 28. Obediently, he taught in the seminary for five years. Then, as superior of seven Marists, he traveled to Western Oceania. The bishop accompanying the missionaries left Peter and a brother on Futuna Island (northeast of Fiji), promising to return in six months. He was gone five years. </p><p>Meanwhile, Peter struggled with this new language and mastered it, making the difficult adjustment to life with whalers, traders, and warring natives. Despite little apparent success and severe want, he maintained a serene and gentle spirit, plus endless patience and courage. A few natives had been baptized, a few more were being instructed. When the chieftain's son asked to be baptized, persecution by the chieftain reached a climax. Father Chanel was clubbed to death. </p><p>Within two years after his death, the whole island became Catholic and has remained so. Peter Chanel is the first martyr of Oceania and its patron.</p> American Catholic Blog No matter what their age, people can continue to make their voices heard in the arenas of public opinion and in the political process. Let nobody say they are too old to be concerned about abortion. As long as we possess life, we have the duty and privilege to defend life.

The Passion and the Cross Ronald Rolheiser

 
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