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Daily Catholic Question

Can Catholics reserve the Eucharist in their home?

By canon law the Blessed Sacrament must be reserved in cathedral and parish churches, and in churches or oratories attached to the houses of religious institutes.

The Eucharist may be reserved in a bishop’s chapel and, with permission of the local ordinary (usually a bishop), in other churches, oratories and chapels.

The law in all cases requires that the sacrament be kept in a church, chapel or oratory. And there are other requirements about a fixed and solid tabernacle.

The law also requires that someone be responsible for the custody and care of the Blessed Sacrament, and that a priest celebrate Mass at the place of reservation with some frequency. That is to make sure the hosts do not age and become stale or moldy.

Notice, the law does not permit reservation of the sacrament in private homes. The purpose of reserving the Eucharist is to have the Blessed Sacrament available as viaticum for those near death, Communion outside of Mass and adoration of the Lord present in the Eucharist.

Reservation in private homes does not very well fit those purposes, and it is difficult to guarantee the Sacrament will be treated with proper respect.

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Wednesday, May 15, 2013
Daily Catholic Question for 5/14/2013 Daily Catholic Question for 5/16/2013


Colette: Colette did not seek the limelight, but in doing God’s will she certainly attracted a lot of attention. 
<p>Colette was born in Corbie, France. At 21 she began to follow the Third Order Rule and became an anchoress, a woman walled into a room whose only opening was a window into a church. </p><p>After four years of prayer and penance in this cell, she left it. With the approval and encouragement of the pope, she joined the Poor Clares and reintroduced the primitive Rule of St. Clare in the 17 monasteries she established. Her sisters were known for their poverty—they rejected any fixed income—and for their perpetual fast. Colette’s reform movement spread to other countries and is still thriving today. Colette was canonized in 1807.</p> American Catholic Blog Being human means that I’m made in God’s image and likeness. Therefore I’m gifted; I have dignity and a great destiny. But being human also means that I’m a creature, not the Creator. I have limits that I need to recognize and respect.

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