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Daily Catholic Question

Why do the stigmata appear in different ways?

Obviously, there are few sure answers we can give or find regarding the stigmata. We are not even certain how the stigmata (wounds of the Passion)looked on Christ’s body. We can only speculate. But we do know that the stigmata do not appear the same in all who are believed to have had them.

One stigmatic, for instance, had only the wounds that would have been made by the crown of thorns. Two possessed only the wound in the side. Some had the lance wound in the left side (Padre Pio), another in the right side (St. Francis of Assisi). One had the hand wounds in the wrists, others in the palms of the hands.

Is it significant that more women than men have had the stigmata? What can we conclude from the fact that most stigmatics came from the Dominican and Franciscan Orders? And what does it say that some saints were stigmatics but not all stigmatics were saints?

Ian Wilson, in Stigmata, searches for a natural explanation. Among the possibilities he suggests is some inner mechanism comparable to that which under stress produces evolutionary adaptations in species.

In his study, Wilson notes some stigmatics seem to have identified with earlier stigmatics—ultimately with Jesus. Finally, Wilson notes, "A really riveting feature is the extraordinary precision of the mechanism’s conformity to the visualization that triggered it. Stigmata have been precisely positioned to conform with the wounds of a stigmatic’s favorite crucifix. Or a wound may have taken on the exact shape, such as a cross."

That seems to imply that the stigmata may occur according to the way the subject pictures or imagines them.

Click here for the rest of today's answer

Sunday, May 12, 2013
Daily Catholic Question for 5/11/2013 Daily Catholic Question for 5/13/2013


Irenaeus: The Church is fortunate that Irenaeus was involved in many of its controversies in the second century. He was a student, well trained, no doubt, with great patience in investigating, tremendously protective of apostolic teaching, but prompted more by a desire to win over his opponents than to prove them in error. 
<p>As bishop of Lyons he was especially concerned with the Gnostics, who took their name from the Greek word for “knowledge.” Claiming access to secret knowledge imparted by Jesus to only a few disciples, their teaching was attracting and confusing many Christians. After thoroughly investigating the various Gnostic sects and their “secret,” Irenaeus showed to what logical conclusions their tenets led. These he contrasted with the teaching of the apostles and the text of Holy Scripture, giving us, in five books, a system of theology of great importance to subsequent times. Moreover, his work, widely used and translated into Latin and Armenian, gradually ended the influence of the Gnostics. </p><p>The circumstances and details about his death, like those of his birth and early life in Asia Minor, are not at all clear.</p> American Catholic Blog Remember this: the Lord wants us to be at peace, and the closer we are to Him, the more peaceful we feel. Peace is a good indicator that our actions are pleasing to Him. On the other hand, a persistent lack of peace typically indicates that the Lord is trying to get your attention. Give Him that attention, and He will show you what's up!

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