AmericanCatholic.org
 
Skip Navigation Links
Home
Catholic News
Saints
Seasonal
Special Reports
Movies
Shopping
Donate
Share:
Facebook
Twitter
Google Plus
LinkedIn
Email
RSS Feeds
Daily Catholic Question

How late may I come to Mass?

Would you say that someone who walked into the upper room just as Jesus blessed the bread and wine and said the words of consecration and then walked out immediately after was present for the Last Supper? Or had shared in and assisted at the Last Supper? As I read the Gospels, the Last Supper was no five-minute affair. Jesus prayed long and offered the apostles much instruction before consecrating and distributing the bread and wine.

Moral theologians used to speak of the principal parts of the Mass (offertory, consecration and Communion), and insist that a person must be present for all three parts to satisfy the Sunday or holy day obligation.

Today liturgists and theologians do not use that terminology. Liturgists speak of the celebration of the Word and the celebration of the Eucharist as the parts of the Mass. Reasons might excuse a person’s coming late. And there may be reasons or difficulties that would excuse a person who missed a notable part of Mass from attending another Mass. But a person who has missed a significant part of Mass has not fulfilled the canonical obligation.

Click here for the rest of today's answer

Sunday, April 13, 2014
Daily Catholic Question for 4/12/2014 Daily Catholic Question for 4/14/2014


John of Capistrano: It has been said the Christian saints are the world’s greatest optimists. Not blind to the existence and consequences of evil, they base their confidence on the power of Christ’s redemption. The power of conversion through Christ extends not only to sinful people but also to calamitous events. 
<p>Imagine being born in the 14th century. One-third of the population and nearly 40 percent of the clergy were wiped out by the bubonic plague. The Western Schism split the Church with two or three claimants to the Holy See at one time. England and France were at war. The city-states of Italy were constantly in conflict. No wonder that gloom dominated the spirit of the culture and the times. </p><p>John Capistrano was born in 1386. His education was thorough. His talents and success were great. When he was 26 he was made governor of Perugia. Imprisoned after a battle against the Malatestas, he resolved to change his way of life completely. At the age of 30 he entered the Franciscan novitiate and was ordained a priest four years later. </p><p>His preaching attracted great throngs at a time of religious apathy and confusion. He and 12 Franciscan brethren were received in the countries of central Europe as angels of God. They were instrumental in reviving a dying faith and devotion. </p><p>The Franciscan Order itself was in turmoil over the interpretation and observance of the Rule of St. Francis. Through John’s tireless efforts and his expertise in law, the heretical Fraticelli were suppressed and the "Spirituals" were freed from interference in their stricter observance. </p><p>He helped bring about a reunion with the Greek and Armenian Churches, unfortunately only a brief arrangement. </p><p>When the Turks captured Constantinople in 1453, he was commissioned to preach a crusade for the defense of Europe. Gaining little response in Bavaria and Austria, he decided to concentrate his efforts in Hungary. He led the army to Belgrade. Under the great General John Hunyadi, they gained an overwhelming victory, and the siege of Belgrade was lifted. Worn out by his superhuman efforts, Capistrano was an easy prey to an infection after the battle. He died October 23, 1456.</p> American Catholic Blog When we are linked by the power of prayer, we as it were, hold each other’s hand as we walk side by side along a slippery path; and thus by the bounteous disposition of charity, it comes about that the harder each one leans on the other, the more firmly we are riveted together in brotherly love. —St. Gregory the Great

 
PICKS OF THE WEEK
Visiting Mary
In this book Cragon captures the experience of visiting these shrines, giving us a personal glimpse into each place.
John Paul II

Here is a book to be read and treasured as we witness the recognition given John Paul II as a saint for our times.

The Surprising Pope

Get new insight into this humble and gentle man—Pope John XXIII--who ushered in the Church's massive changes of Vatican II.

Stories of Jesus

The author of the Joshua series, Fr. Joseph Girzone, retells the ancient stories of Jesus in ways that make them fresh and accessible.

Pope Francis!

Why did the pope choose the name Francis? Find out in this new book by Gina Loehr.


 
CATHOLIC GREETINGS
Palm Sunday
Holy Week services and prayers invite us to follow Jesus into Jerusalem, experiencing the events of his passion and death.
Praying for You
As they grow closer to the Easter sacraments, your parish’s RCIA candidates welcome your prayers.
Blessed John Paul
Remember the legacy of this soon-to-be-canonized pope with a Catholic Greetings e-card.
Lent
Our Lenten journey is almost complete. Catholic Greetings helps you share how this season has been a blessing for you.
I'm Sorry
Asking for forgiveness begins the healing process. Let a Catholic Greetings e-card help you take this first step.



Come find us at: Facebook | St. Anthony Messenger magazine Twitter | American Catholic YouTube | American Catholic


An AmericanCatholic.org Site from the Franciscans and Franciscan Media Copyright © 1996 - 2014