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Daily Catholic Question

Are the Annunciation and the Immaculate Conception the same thing?

The Annunciation, observed on March 25, celebrates Mary’s miraculous conception of Jesus, who has no human biological father. Because the angel Gabriel “announced” the conception to her (Luke 1:26-38), the feast is known as the Annunciation. Mary’s response to Gabriel, “May it be done to me according to your word” (Luke 1:38b), sets the pattern of openness for everyone who follows Jesus.

The feast of the Immaculate Conception, observed on December 8, celebrates the conception of Mary by her parents (Joachim and Anne, according to an early Christian tradition). The conception was natural except that Mary was preserved from original sin. Even though this teaching was solemnly defined only in 1854 by Pope Pius IX, Catholics had believed it and celebrated it liturgically for many centuries.

Because there is no Gospel story specifically about the conception of Mary, the Catholic Church uses the same passage (Luke 1:26-38, Gabriel’s announcement to Mary) on each solemnity—even though each celebrates a different conception.

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Friday, March 8, 2013
Daily Catholic Question for 3/7/2013 Daily Catholic Question for 3/9/2013


Colette: Colette did not seek the limelight, but in doing God’s will she certainly attracted a lot of attention. 
<p>Colette was born in Corbie, France. At 21 she began to follow the Third Order Rule and became an anchoress, a woman walled into a room whose only opening was a window into a church. </p><p>After four years of prayer and penance in this cell, she left it. With the approval and encouragement of the pope, she joined the Poor Clares and reintroduced the primitive Rule of St. Clare in the 17 monasteries she established. Her sisters were known for their poverty—they rejected any fixed income—and for their perpetual fast. Colette’s reform movement spread to other countries and is still thriving today. Colette was canonized in 1807.</p> American Catholic Blog Being human means that I’m made in God’s image and likeness. Therefore I’m gifted; I have dignity and a great destiny. But being human also means that I’m a creature, not the Creator. I have limits that I need to recognize and respect.

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