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Daily Catholic Question

Are priests required to take vows of chastity as well as celibacy?

Bishops, priests, and deacons are clerics. Canon 277 obliges clerics to observe perfect and perpetual continence and celibacy for the kingdom of heaven and that they "can adhere more easily to Christ with an undivided heart and can more freely dedicate themselves to the service of God and humankind."

Canon 1037 requires that unmarried candidates for the permanent diaconate and candidates for the priesthood must publicly assume before God and the Church the obligation of celibacy if they have not professed vows (including chastity) in a religious institute. Married men who are ordained to the permanent diaconate who become widowed may not remarry without a dispensation.

Of course, all Christians are called to chastity. A Concise Dictionary of Theology (Paulist) defines chastity as: "that virtue which enables human beings to integrate sexuality within their whole personality according to their vocation in life: for the celibate, through complete abstention, for the married, through fidelity and for single persons, through self-control."

The violation of chastity by anyone is a sin if all the conditions of sin are present.

Click here for the rest of today's answer

Wednesday, March 6, 2013
Daily Catholic Question for 3/5/2013 Daily Catholic Question for 3/7/2013


Philip and James: 
		<b>James, Son of Alphaeus:</b> We know nothing of this man except his name, and of course the fact that Jesus chose him to be one of the 12 pillars of the New Israel, his Church. He is not the James of Acts, son of Clopas, “brother” of Jesus and later bishop of Jerusalem and the traditional author of the Letter of James. James, son of Alphaeus, is also known as James the Lesser to avoid confusing him with James the son of Zebedee, also an apostle and known as James the Greater. 
<p><b>Philip:</b> Philip came from the same town as Peter and Andrew, Bethsaida in Galilee. Jesus called him directly, whereupon he sought out Nathanael and told him of the “one about whom Moses wrote” (John 1:45). </p><p>Like the other apostles, Philip took a long time coming to realize who Jesus was. On one occasion, when Jesus saw the great multitude following him and wanted to give them food, he asked Philip where they should buy bread for the people to eat. St. John comments, “[Jesus] said this to test him, because he himself knew what he was going to do” (John 6:6). Philip answered, “Two hundred days’ wages worth of food would not be enough for each of them to have a little [bit]” (John 6:7). </p><p>John’s story is not a put-down of Philip. It was simply necessary for these men who were to be the foundation stones of the Church to see the clear distinction between humanity’s total helplessness apart from God and the human ability to be a bearer of divine power by God’s gift. </p><p>On another occasion, we can almost hear the exasperation in Jesus’ voice. After Thomas had complained that they did not know where Jesus was going, Jesus said, “I am the way...If you know me, then you will also know my Father. From now on you do know him and have seen him” (John 14:6a, 7). Then Philip said, “Master, show us the Father, and that will be enough for us” (John 14:8). Enough! Jesus answered, “Have I been with you for so long a time and you still do not know me, Philip? Whoever has seen me has seen the Father” (John 14:9a). </p><p>Possibly because Philip bore a Greek name or because he was thought to be close to Jesus, some Gentile proselytes came to him and asked him to introduce them to Jesus. Philip went to Andrew, and Andrew went to Jesus. Jesus’ reply in John’s Gospel is indirect; Jesus says that now his “hour” has come, that in a short time he will give his life for Jew and Gentile alike.</p> American Catholic Blog Only in human weakness do many of us begin to rely on God and explicitly repudiate our own divine ambitions. Every pain alerts us to the fact that we are not the Almighty.

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