AmericanCatholic.org
 
Skip Navigation Links
Home
Catholic News
Seasonal
Saints
Special Reports
Movies
Social Media
Shopping
Donate
Share:
Facebook
Twitter
Google Plus
LinkedIn
Email
RSS Feeds

advertisement
Daily Catholic Question

Is it OK for a company to lay off its employees?

When is a company justified in laying off its employees? Does a Catholic institution, such as a hospital, have more of a responsibility to ensure the job security of its employees and to avoid layoffs?

There are no hard-and-fast numbers that would justify laying off employees or reducing a work force. Situations could range from a business owned and administered by one person to a huge company with hundreds of employees and many investors or stockholders.

But surely the threat of going bankrupt would justify reducing a work force to the point where a business can survive and be profitable. To continue running a business at a loss means eventual collapse and ruin for everyone in the enterprise with damage to creditors.

Good and just management looks at the welfare of investors, employees and customers in its decisionmaking. The interests of all need to be balanced.

A Catholic institution, above all, should be aware of how the social encyclicals lay out its obligations to the institution's employees as well as to those it serves. Part of its concern should be managing its affairs to avoid large and sudden layoffs that disrupt the lives and welfare of workers.

If forced to reduce the institution's staff, management might do so by attrition. It should also provide severance pay and assist the employee in finding a new job.

Click here for the rest of today's answer

Monday, March 04, 2013
Daily Catholic Question for 3/3/2013 Daily Catholic Question for 3/5/2013

Benedict Joseph Labre: Benedict Joseph Labre was truly eccentric, one of God's special little ones. Born in France and the eldest of 18 children, he studied under his uncle, a parish priest. Because of poor health and a lack of suitable academic preparation he was unsuccessful in his attempts to enter the religious life. Then, at 16 years of age, a profound change took place. Benedict lost his desire to study and gave up all thoughts of the priesthood, much to the consternation of his relatives. 
<p>He became a pilgrim, traveling from one great shrine to another, living off alms. He wore the rags of a beggar and shared his food with the poor. Filled with the love of God and neighbor, Benedict had special devotion to the Blessed Mother and to the Blessed Sacrament. In Rome, where he lived in the Colosseum for a time, he was called "the poor man of the Forty Hours Devotion" and "the beggar of Rome." The people accepted his ragged appearance better than he did. His excuse to himself was that "our comfort is not in this world." </p><p>On the last day of his life, April 16, 1783, Benedict Joseph dragged himself to a church in Rome and prayed there for two hours before he collapsed, dying peacefully in a nearby house. Immediately after his death the people proclaimed him a saint. </p><p>He was officially proclaimed a saint by Pope Leo XIII at canonization ceremonies in 1883.</p> American Catholic Blog Today offers limitless possibilities for holiness. Lean into His grace. The only thing keeping us from sainthood is ourselves.

 
PICKS OF THE WEEK
New audiobook
Ronald Rolheiser on the Eucharist—discover true intimacy with God and one another!
New book
Are you ready to get your faith in shape? This book is your personal trainer!
New book from Mark Hart
Faith and humor from the Bible Geek in 140 characters or less. #Youwillbeblessed
New from Dr. Ray Guarendi
Dr. Ray coaches parents to make discipline less frequent, less frustrating, and more consistent!
The Pope Who Quit
Learn about Pope Celestine V and why he gave up the chair of St. Peter.

 
CATHOLIC GREETINGS
Happy Birthday
Even during Lent a birthday is a good reason to rejoice. Be a part of the festivities with a birthday e-greeting.
Third Sunday in Lent
Keep in mind today that the cross of Christ is at the heart of our faith.
Reconciliation
Make time soon to be reconciled to God, Church, family and friends. Express your peacefulness with our e-cards.
Love
Surprise someone you love today. Catholic Greetings offers you a selection of e-cards from which to choose.
Lent
In this season of penance, may we put aside those things that keep us from the Lord.



Come find us at: Facebook | St. Anthony Messenger magazine Twitter | American Catholic YouTube | American Catholic