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Daily Catholic Question

Who set up the 14 Stations of the Cross and why?

Since the first century, Christians have been making pilgrimages to the land where Jesus lived. St. Helena, mother of Emperor Constantine, made a famous pilgrimage in the fourth century, trying to identify where Jesus was born, died, and was buried.

For a short time after 1099 when the crusaders captured Jerusalem and nearby territory, visiting these sites was easier. After the crusaders lost this territory in 1291, pilgrimages became much more dangerous and expensive.

The Stations of the Cross, also known as the Way of the Cross, bring the Holy Land both to people unable to travel there and to those who have made that pilgrimage.

Francis of Assisi had two great devotions: Jesus’ Incarnation and his passion, symbolized in the crib and the cross.

The Franciscan friars popularized the Way of the Cross devotion, starting in the fourteenth century. People erected small stations inside churches and sometimes life-size ones outdoors. Soon, almost all churches had a Way of the Cross. A Franciscan wrote the Stabat Mater lyrics, often used during the Stations in the original Latin or in translation.

The number of stations and the events commemorated have varied over the centuries. Pope Clement XII (1730-40) fixed the present number and list.

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Tuesday, March 26, 2013
Daily Catholic Question for 3/25/2013 Daily Catholic Question for 3/27/2013


Antonio Lucci: Antonio studied with and was a friend of St. Francesco Antonio Fasani, who after Antonio Lucci’s death testified at the diocesan hearings regarding the holiness of Lucci. 
<p>Born in Agnone in southern Italy, a city famous for manufacturing bells and copper crafts, he was given the name Angelo at Baptism. He attended the local school run by the Conventual Franciscans and joined them at the age of 16. Antonio completed his studies for the priesthood in Assisi, where he was ordained in 1705. Further studies led to a doctorate in theology and appointments as a teacher in Agnone, Ravello and Naples. He also served as guardian in Naples. </p><p>Elected minister provincial in 1718, the following year he was appointed professor at St. Bonaventure College in Rome, a position he held until Pope Benedict XIII chose him as bishop of Bovino (near Foggia) in 1729. The pope explained, "I have chosen as bishop of Bovino an eminent theologian and a great saint." </p><p>His 23 years as bishop were marked by visits to local parishes and a renewal of gospel living among the people of his diocese. He dedicated his episcopal income to works of education and charity. At the urging of the Conventual minister general, Bishop Lucci wrote a major book about the saints and blesseds in the first 200 years of the Conventual Franciscans. </p><p>He was beatified in 1989, three years after his friend Francesco Antonio Fasani was canonized.</p> American Catholic Blog Not too many people need academia to teach them the power of positives. That has been known since Adam and Eve. The soul of strong family life is wrapped throughout with positives—love, affection, praise, commitment. The more a child receives the positives, the less he gives the negatives.

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