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Daily Catholic Question

Why do churches veil crucifixes and statues during Lent?

The custom of veiling crosses and images during the last part of Lent has changed over the centuries.

According to Adolf Adam in The Liturgical Year, in the eleventh century a cloth, called the "hunger cloth," was suspended in front of the altar beginning with the fifth Sunday of Lent. At the beginning of Lent public sinners were excluded from Church. The "hunger cloth" may have been an acknowledgment that we all are sinners and are partaking in a "fast of the eyes."

By the end of the thirteenth century statues, crosses, and pictures were veiled. French Bishop William Durandus explained it by saying Jesus veiled his divinity during his passion and that the Gospel of the fifth Sunday of Lent ended by telling us "Jesus hid and went out of the temple area" (John 8:59).

Later writers would tell us the veiling was to remind us of Jesus' humiliation and to imprint the image of the crucified Christ more deeply on our hearts.

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Saturday, March 23, 2013
Daily Catholic Question for 3/22/2013 Daily Catholic Question for 3/24/2013


Francesco Antonio Fasani: Born in Lucera (southeast Italy), Francesco entered the Conventual Franciscans in 1695. After his ordination 10 years later, he taught philosophy to younger friars, served as guardian of his friary and later became provincial. When his term of office ended, Francesco became master of novices and finally pastor in his hometown. 
<p>In his various ministries, he was loving, devout and penitential. He was a sought-after confessor and preacher. One witness at the canonical hearings regarding Francesco’s holiness testified, "In his preaching he spoke in a familiar way, filled as he was with the love of God and neighbor; fired by the Spirit, he made use of the words and deed of Holy Scripture, stirring his listeners and moving them to do penance." Francesco showed himself a loyal friend of the poor, never hesitating to seek from benefactors what was needed. </p><p>At his death in Lucera, children ran through the streets and cried out, "The saint is dead! The saint is dead!" Francesco was canonized in 1986.</p> American Catholic Blog As people of faith, we wake up with a purpose. We have a sense of mission, and this gives our lives enduring meaning. We can share with confidence the Word of God, no matter what circumstances we find ourselves in. There are no chance encounters!

 
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