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Daily Catholic Question

Why do churches veil crucifixes and statues during Lent?

The custom of veiling crosses and images during the last part of Lent has changed over the centuries.

According to Adolf Adam in The Liturgical Year, in the eleventh century a cloth, called the "hunger cloth," was suspended in front of the altar beginning with the fifth Sunday of Lent. At the beginning of Lent public sinners were excluded from Church. The "hunger cloth" may have been an acknowledgment that we all are sinners and are partaking in a "fast of the eyes."

By the end of the thirteenth century statues, crosses, and pictures were veiled. French Bishop William Durandus explained it by saying Jesus veiled his divinity during his passion and that the Gospel of the fifth Sunday of Lent ended by telling us "Jesus hid and went out of the temple area" (John 8:59).

Later writers would tell us the veiling was to remind us of Jesus' humiliation and to imprint the image of the crucified Christ more deeply on our hearts.

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Saturday, March 23, 2013
Daily Catholic Question for 3/22/2013 Daily Catholic Question for 3/24/2013

Catherine of Alexandria: According to the <i>Legend of St. Catherine</i>, this young woman converted to Christianity after receiving a vision. At the age of 18, she debated 50 pagan philosophers. Amazed at her wisdom and debating skills, they became Christians—as did about 200 soldiers and members of the emperor’s family. All of them were martyred. 
<p>Sentenced to be executed on a spiked wheel, Catherine touched the wheel and it shattered. She was beheaded. Centuries later, angels are said to have carried the body of St. Catherine to a monastery at the foot of Mt. Sinai. </p><p>Devotion to her spread as a result of the Crusades. She was invoked as the patroness of students, teachers, librarians and lawyers. Catherine is one of the 14 Holy Helpers, venerated especially in Germany and Hungary.</p> American Catholic Blog We exist because God is infinitely beautiful, infinitely good, and overflowing with a love that seeks to share itself. When he made us and placed us in this glittering created world, it was an act of pure generosity.

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