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Daily Catholic Question

Why do churches veil crucifixes and statues during Lent?

The custom of veiling crosses and images during the last part of Lent has changed over the centuries.

According to Adolf Adam in The Liturgical Year, in the eleventh century a cloth, called the "hunger cloth," was suspended in front of the altar beginning with the fifth Sunday of Lent. At the beginning of Lent public sinners were excluded from Church. The "hunger cloth" may have been an acknowledgment that we all are sinners and are partaking in a "fast of the eyes."

By the end of the thirteenth century statues, crosses, and pictures were veiled. French Bishop William Durandus explained it by saying Jesus veiled his divinity during his passion and that the Gospel of the fifth Sunday of Lent ended by telling us "Jesus hid and went out of the temple area" (John 8:59).

Later writers would tell us the veiling was to remind us of Jesus' humiliation and to imprint the image of the crucified Christ more deeply on our hearts.

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Saturday, March 23, 2013
Daily Catholic Question for 3/22/2013 Daily Catholic Question for 3/24/2013


Rose Venerini: Rose was born at Viterbo in Italy, the daughter of a doctor. Following the death of her fiancé she entered a convent, but soon returned home to care for her newly widowed mother. Meanwhile, Rose invited the women of the neighborhood to recite the rosary in her home, forming a sort of sodality with them. 
<p>As she looked to her future, Rose, under the spiritual guidance of a Jesuit priest, became convinced that she was called to become a teacher in the world rather than a contemplative nun in a convent. Clearly, she made the right choice: She was a born teacher, and the free school for girls she opened in 1685 was well received. </p><p>Soon the cardinal invited her to oversee the training of teachers and the administration of schools in his Diocese of Montefiascone. As Rose's reputation grew, she was called upon to organize schools in many parts of Italy, including Rome. Her disposition was right for the task as well, for Rose often met considerable opposition but was never deterred. </p><p>She died in Rome in 1728, where a number of miracles were attributed to her. She was beatified in 1952 and canonized in 2006. The sodality, or group of women she had invited to prayer, was ultimately given the rank of a religious congregation. Today, the so-called Venerini Sisters can be found in the United States and elsewhere, working among Italian immigrants.</p> American Catholic Blog God is a protective and loving father, with us always. In fact, at every moment and in every situation, He's reaching out to us to bring us home to His heart. He has given us the greatest book ever, the Bible, to guide us back to a relationship with Him, and He has given us a torch, the Light of the World, His only begotten Son, to light the way.

Walk Softly and Carry a Great Bag

 
CATHOLIC GREETINGS
Palm Sunday
Holy Week services and prayers invite us to follow Jesus into Jerusalem, experiencing the events of his passion and death.

Thank You
For Christians, gratitude is always an appropriate response to God’s goodness.

Praying for You
As they grow closer to the Easter sacraments, your parish’s RCIA candidates welcome your prayers.

Lent
Our Lenten journey is almost complete. Catholic Greetings helps you share how this season has been a blessing for you.

St. Joseph
Now honored as patron of the universal Church, this humble carpenter devoted his life to caring for Mary and Jesus.




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