Skip Navigation Links
Catholic News
Special Reports
Google Plus
RSS Feeds
Daily Catholic Question

Is confession just for the "big" sins?

The Catechism says that we must confess all mortal sins of which we are aware, following a diligent examination of conscience. It also advises that, while it is not necessary, it is good to confess our everyday faults (venial sins).

With that said, note that the ritual for the sacrament of reconciliation gives us a five-page examination of conscience in Appendix III. The examination follows the Ten Commandments under three general headings which look at our relations with God and each other and our efforts to grow in the likeness to God.

Any spiritual director would suggest that penitents using an examination of conscience look for what we call the predominant fault. Try to determine what drives you in your daily life. What motivates your actions? What determines the decisions you make in family life, in social life, in your business dealings? And look not just at the wrong you may have done but also at the good you left undone.

Click here for the rest of today's answer

Tuesday, March 19, 2013
Daily Catholic Question for 3/18/2013 Daily Catholic Question for 3/20/2013

Bruno: This saint has the honor of having founded a religious order which, as the saying goes, has never had to be reformed because it was never deformed. No doubt both the founder and the members would reject such high praise, but it is an indication of the saint's intense love of a penitential life in solitude. 
<p>Bruno was born in Cologne, Germany, became a famous teacher at Rheims and was appointed chancellor of the archdiocese at the age of 45. He supported Pope Gregory VII in his fight against the decadence of the clergy and took part in the removal of his own scandalous archbishop, Manasses. Bruno suffered the plundering of his house for his pains. </p><p>He had a dream of living in solitude and prayer, and persuaded a few friends to join him in a hermitage. After a while he felt the place unsuitable and, through a friend, was given some land which was to become famous for his foundation "in the Chartreuse" (from which comes the word Carthusians). The climate, desert, mountainous terrain and inaccessibility guaranteed silence, poverty and small numbers. </p><p>Bruno and his friends built an oratory with small individual cells at a distance from each other. They met for Matins and Vespers each day and spent the rest of the time in solitude, eating together only on great feasts. Their chief work was copying manuscripts. </p><p>The pope, hearing of Bruno's holiness, called for his assistance in Rome. When the pope had to flee Rome, Bruno pulled up stakes again, and spent his last years (after refusing a bishopric) in the wilderness of Calabria. </p><p>He was never formally canonized, because the Carthusians were averse to all occasions of publicity. However Pope Clement X extended his feast to the whole Church in 1674.</p> American Catholic Blog The saints in heaven love and care for us, and so it is fitting that we pray to them and ask for their prayers, as we on earth assist one another through prayer.


St. Joseph
Now honored as patron of the universal Church, this humble carpenter devoted his life to caring for Mary and Jesus.

Happy Birthday
Birthdays matter because each one of us matters. Send a Catholic Greetings e-card to join the celebration.

Fifth Sunday in Lent
Especially during Lent the Church encourages us to gather all our triumphs and tragedies and place them at the foot of the cross.

St. Patrick's Day
This patron saint of Ireland grew in his understanding of God through his ministry with God’s people.

Especially during Lent the Church encourages us to gather all our triumphs and tragedies and place them at the foot of the cross.

Come find us at: Facebook | St. Anthony Messenger magazine Twitter | American Catholic YouTube | American Catholic

An Site from the Franciscans and Franciscan Media Copyright © 1996 - 2015