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Daily Catholic Question

Who can be saved?

According to news reports, a cardinal recently said that only Catholics can get to heaven.

You are probably referring to the document Dominus Iesus [The Lord Jesus]: On the Unicity and Salvific Universality of Jesus Christ and the Church. Many news stories erroneously reported that, according to this document, only Catholics can go to heaven.

This instruction is directed primarily to those involved in interreligious dialogues (that is, with non-Christians). It denounces any downplaying of the unique and saving role of Jesus, any seeing him as one savior among many possibilities.

The document also addresses how Jesus’ Church is related to other Churches or faith communities. As Vatican II taught, the Church which Jesus founded “subsists” in the Catholic Church (Dogmatic Constitution on the Church, #8).  “Subsists” is not the same as “is.” The bishops at Vatican II chose this word very carefully.

Nothing in this instruction contradicts the Church’s faith as expressed in one of its eucharistic prayers, “...and all the dead whose faith is known to you [God] alone.”

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Friday, February 8, 2013
Daily Catholic Question for 2/7/2013 Daily Catholic Question for 2/9/2013


Anthony Zaccaria: At the same time that Martin Luther was attacking abuses in the Church, a reformation within the Church was already being attempted. Among the early movers of the Counter-Reformation was Anthony Zaccaria. His mother became a widow at 18 and devoted herself to the spiritual education of her son. He received a medical doctorate at 22 and, while working among the poor of his native Cremona in Italy, was attracted to the religious apostolate. He renounced his rights to any future inheritance, worked as a catechist and was ordained a priest at the age of 26. Called to Milan in a few years, he laid the foundations of three religious congregations, one for men and one for women, plus an association of married couples. Their aim was the reform of the decadent society of their day, beginning with the clergy, religious and lay people. 
<p>Greatly inspired by St. Paul (his congregation is named the Barnabites, after the companion of that saint), Anthony preached with great vigor in church and street, conducted popular missions and was not ashamed of doing public penance. </p><p>He encouraged such innovations as the collaboration of the laity in the apostolate, frequent Communion, the Forty Hours devotion and the ringing of church bells at 3:00 p.m. on Fridays. </p><p>His holiness moved many to reform their lives but, as with all saints, it also moved many to oppose him. Twice his community had to undergo official religious investigation, and twice it was exonerated. </p><p>While on a mission of peace, he became seriously ill and was brought home for a visit to his mother. He died at Cremona at the age of 36.</p> American Catholic Blog Lord, help me make my life more about you and less about me. May others see you in me—your image and likeness. Teach me ways to increase my time with you, my service to others, and my love for my family, for strangers, and for the poor. You are the light in the darkness. With each new day, may we be light to one another.

Stumble Virtue Vice and the Space Between

 
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St. Josephine Bakhita
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