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Daily Catholic Question

Did St. Rita murder her sons?

St. Rita was married to a violent man and their two sons inherited his personality. After eighteen years of marriage, her husband experienced a kind of conversion. Shortly thereafter, he was murdered.

Rita's sons swore vengeance. Concerned for their eternal welfare, Rita prayed that her sons would die rather than commit murder and lose their souls. They did, in fact, fall seriously ill. Their long recovery, through which their doting mother tended to them, gave their anger time to dissipate.

So, no. Although St. Rita clearly valued her sons' eternal destiny more than their temporal welfare, she certainly did not murder them.

Click here for the rest of today's answer

Wednesday, February 27, 2013
Daily Catholic Question for 2/26/2013 Daily Catholic Question for 2/28/2013


John Francis Burté and Companions: These priests were victims of the French Revolution. Though their martyrdom spans a period of several years, they stand together in the Church’s memory because they all gave their lives for the same principle. The Civil Constitution of the Clergy (1791) required all priests to take an oath which amounted to a denial of the faith. Each of these men refused and was executed.
<p>John Francis Burté became a Franciscan at 16 and after ordination taught theology to the young friars. Later he was guardian of the large Conventual friary in Paris until he was arrested and held in the convent of the Carmelites.
</p><p>Appolinaris of Posat was born in 1739 in Switzerland. He joined the Capuchins and acquired a reputation as an excellent preacher, confessor and instructor of clerics. Sent to the East as a missionary, he was in Paris studying Oriental languages when the French Revolution began. Refusing the oath, he was swiftly arrested and detained in the Carmelite convent.
</p><p>Severin Girault, a member of the Third Order Regular, was a chaplain for a group of sisters in Paris. Imprisoned with the others, he was the first to die in the slaughter at the convent.
</p><p>These three plus 182 others—including several bishops and many religious and diocesan priests—were massacred at the Carmelite house in Paris on September 2, 1792. They were beatified in 1926.
</p><p>John Baptist Triquerie, born in 1737, entered the Conventual Franciscans. He was chaplain and confessor of Poor Clare monasteries in three cities before he was arrested for refusing to take the oath. He and 13 diocesan priests were guillotined in Laval on January 21, 1794. He was beatified in 1955.</p> American Catholic Blog The amazing friends I have: I didn’t “find” them; I certainly
don’t deserve them; but I do have them. And there is only one feasible reason: because my friends are God’s gift to me in proof of His love for me, His friendship.

 
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