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Daily Catholic Question

Is plastic surgery wrong?

There is no prohibition against Catholics having plastic surgery. Plastic surgery for someone with a cleft palate, for a person burned in a fire or injured in an accident—these are all fine if the person or a parent or guardian seeks them.

Like anything human, plastic surgery could be abused. At some point, elective plastic surgery could become a moral issue in terms of allowing or encouraging such surgery for those able to pay while denying life-and-death surgery for those unable to pay. Medical resources are not infinite, and some ways of allocating them could be immoral.

Click here for the rest of today's answer

Saturday, February 23, 2013
Daily Catholic Question for 2/22/2013 Daily Catholic Question for 2/24/2013


Joachim and Anne: In the Scriptures, Matthew and Luke furnish a legal family history of Jesus, tracing ancestry to show that Jesus is the culmination of great promises. Not only is his mother’s family neglected, we also know nothing factual about them except that they existed. Even the names <i>Joachim</i> and <i>Anne</i> come from a legendary source written more than a century after Jesus died. 
<p>The heroism and holiness of these people, however, is inferred from the whole family atmosphere around Mary in the Scriptures. Whether we rely on the legends about Mary’s childhood or make guesses from the information in the Bible, we see in her a fulfillment of many generations of prayerful persons, herself steeped in the religious traditions of her people. </p><p>The strong character of Mary in making decisions, her continuous practice of prayer, her devotion to the laws of her faith, her steadiness at moments of crisis, and her devotion to her relatives—all indicate a close-knit, loving family that looked forward to the next generation even while retaining the best of the past. </p><p>Joachim and Anne—whether these are their real names or not—represent that entire quiet series of generations who faithfully perform their duties, practice their faith and establish an atmosphere for the coming of the Messiah, but remain obscure.</p> American Catholic Blog Don’t pretend to be a saint—intend to be one. Bend your knees but never your morals.

 
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