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Daily Catholic Question

Is plastic surgery wrong?

There is no prohibition against Catholics having plastic surgery. Plastic surgery for someone with a cleft palate, for a person burned in a fire or injured in an accident—these are all fine if the person or a parent or guardian seeks them.

Like anything human, plastic surgery could be abused. At some point, elective plastic surgery could become a moral issue in terms of allowing or encouraging such surgery for those able to pay while denying life-and-death surgery for those unable to pay. Medical resources are not infinite, and some ways of allocating them could be immoral.

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Saturday, February 23, 2013
Daily Catholic Question for 2/22/2013 Daily Catholic Question for 2/24/2013


Paul of the Cross: 
		<p>Born in northern Italy in 1694, Paul Daneo lived at a time when many regarded Jesus as a great moral teacher but no more. After a brief time as a soldier, he turned to solitary prayer, developing a devotion to Christ’s passion. Paul saw in the Lord’s passion a demonstration of God’s love for all people. In turn that devotion nurtured his compassion and supported a preaching ministry that touched the hearts of many listeners. He was known as one of the most popular preachers of his day, both for his words and for his generous acts of mercy. </p>
		<p>In 1720 Paul founded the Congregation of the Passion, whose members combined devotion to Christ’s passion with preaching to the poor and rigorous penances. Known as the Passionists, they add a fourth vow to the traditional three of poverty, chastity, and obedience, to spread the memory of Christ’s passion among the faithful. Paul was elected superior general of the Congregation in 1747, spending the remainder of his life in Rome. </p>
		<p>Paul of the Cross died in 1775, and was canonized in 1867. Over 2000 of his letters and several of his short writings have survived. </p>
American Catholic Blog Always bear in mind as a safe general rule that while God tries us by His crosses and sufferings, He always leaves us a glimmer of light by which we continue to have great trust in him and to recognize His immense goodness.

 
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