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Daily Catholic Question

What does "reparation" mean?

In general, reparation means repairing or making up for damages done. In a spiritual sense, we sinners make reparation for our sins and the sins of others through voluntary acts of penance or works of piety and devotion done in the spirit of reparation.

To make reparation for acts of blasphemy and profanity, Catholics recite the divine praises ("Blessed be God, Blessed be his holy name," etc.), especially after Benediction of the Blessed Sacrament.

Devotion to the Sacred Heart of Jesus, as promoted by St. Margaret Mary Alacoque, calls for prayers and acts of reparation as well as Communions (especially on First Fridays) received in the spirit of reparation and atonement.

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Thursday, February 21, 2013
Daily Catholic Question for 2/20/2013 Daily Catholic Question for 2/22/2013


James Oldo: You’ve heard rags-to-riches stories. Today, we celebrate the reverse. 
<p>James of Oldo was born into a well-to-do family near Milan in 1364. He married a woman who, like him, appreciated the comforts that came with wealth. But an outbreak of plague drove James, his wife and their three children out of their home and into the countryside. Despite those precautions, two of his daughters died from the plague, James determined to use whatever time he had left to build up treasures in heaven and to build God’s realm on earth. </p><p>He and his wife became Secular Franciscans. James gave up his old lifestyle and did penance for his sins. He cared for a sick priest, who taught him Latin. Upon the death of his wife, James himself became a priest. His house was transformed into a chapel where small groups of people, many of them fellow Secular Franciscans, came for prayer and support. James focused on caring for the sick and for prisoners of war. He died in 1404 after contracting a disease from one of his patients. </p><p>James Oldo was beatified in 1933.</p> American Catholic Blog Charity for the poor is like a living flame: the more dry the wood, the brighter it burns.


 
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Feliz Cumpleaños
Spanish-speaking friends will appreciate your thoughtfulness in finding a birthday e-card in Spanish!

First Sunday in Lent
Assure your parish’s newly Elect of your prayers as they journey toward Easter.




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