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Daily Catholic Question

Are the symbols on the dollar bill anti-Christian?

What do the pyramid and eye on the back of our one-dollar bill mean? Are they anti-Christian?

The symbols to which you refer are the reverse side of the Great Seal of the United States: the triangle and eye atop an unfinished pyramid with the words Annuit Coeptis above them and the date 1776 in Roman numerals below with the words Novus Ordo Seclorum. We are more accustomed to seeing the front side of the seal with the American eagle clutching 13 arrows in its talons.

The Department of State, keeper of the seal, says the pyramid symbolizes strength and durability. The 13 layers of stone represent the original states. The fact that the pyramid is unfinished means the United States is always growing, building, and improving.

In Christian symbols a triangle represents the divine Trinity and an eye the all-seeing eye of God. It suggests the importance of divine guidance. Annuit Coeptis can be translated "He [God] has favored our undertakings" and Novus Ordo Seclorum, "A new order of the ages," meaning the new American era.

There is nothing inherently anti-Christian in any of these symbols.

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Monday, February 18, 2013
Daily Catholic Question for 2/17/2013 Daily Catholic Question for 2/19/2013


Gabriel of Our Lady of Sorrows: Born in Italy into a large family and baptized Francis, he lost his mother when he was only four years old. He was educated by the Jesuits and, having been cured twice of serious illnesses, came to believe that God was calling him to the religious life. Young Francis wished to join the Jesuits but was turned down, probably because of his age, not yet 17. Following the death of a sister to cholera, his resolve to enter religious life became even stronger and he was accepted by the Passionists. Upon entering the novitiate he was given the name Gabriel of Our Lady of Sorrows.
<p>Ever popular and cheerful, Gabriel quickly was successful in his effort to be faithful in little things. His spirit of prayer, love for the poor, consideration of the feelings of others, exact observance of the Passionist Rule as well as his bodily penances—always subject to the will of his wise superiors— made a deep impression on everyone.
</p><p>His superiors had great expectations of Gabriel as he prepared for the priesthood, but after only four years of religious life symptoms of tuberculosis appeared. Ever obedient, he patiently bore the painful effects of the disease and the restrictions it required, seeking no special notice. He died peacefully on February 27, 1862, at age 24, having been an example to both young and old.
</p><p>Gabriel of Our Lady of Sorrows was canonized in 1920.</p> American Catholic Blog Life is not always happy, but our connections to others can create a simple and grace-filled quiet celebration of our own and others’ lives. These others are the presence of Christ in our lives.


 
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