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Daily Catholic Question

Are the symbols on the dollar bill anti-Christian?

What do the pyramid and eye on the back of our one-dollar bill mean? Are they anti-Christian?

The symbols to which you refer are the reverse side of the Great Seal of the United States: the triangle and eye atop an unfinished pyramid with the words Annuit Coeptis above them and the date 1776 in Roman numerals below with the words Novus Ordo Seclorum. We are more accustomed to seeing the front side of the seal with the American eagle clutching 13 arrows in its talons.

The Department of State, keeper of the seal, says the pyramid symbolizes strength and durability. The 13 layers of stone represent the original states. The fact that the pyramid is unfinished means the United States is always growing, building, and improving.

In Christian symbols a triangle represents the divine Trinity and an eye the all-seeing eye of God. It suggests the importance of divine guidance. Annuit Coeptis can be translated "He [God] has favored our undertakings" and Novus Ordo Seclorum, "A new order of the ages," meaning the new American era.

There is nothing inherently anti-Christian in any of these symbols.

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Monday, February 18, 2013
Daily Catholic Question for 2/17/2013 Daily Catholic Question for 2/19/2013


Sharbel Makhluf: Although this saint never traveled far from the Lebanese village of Beka-Kafra, where he was born, his influence has spread widely. 
<p>Joseph Zaroun Makluf was raised by an uncle because his father, a mule driver, died when Joseph was only three. At the age of 23, Joseph joined the Monastery of St. Maron at Annaya, Lebanon, and took the name Sharbel in honor of a second-century martyr. He professed his final vows in 1853 and was ordained six years later. </p><p>Following the example of the fifth-century St. Maron, Sharbel lived as a hermit from 1875 until his death. His reputation for holiness prompted people to seek him to receive a blessing and to be remembered in his prayers. He followed a strict fast and was very devoted to the Blessed Sacrament. When his superiors occasionally asked him to administer the sacraments to nearby villages, Sharbel did so gladly. </p><p>He died in the late afternoon on Christmas Eve. Christians and non-Christians soon made his tomb a place of pilgrimage and of cures. Pope Paul VI beatified him in 1965 and canonized him 12 years later.</p> American Catholic Blog You cannot claim to be ‘for Christ’ and espouse a political cause that implies callous indifference to the needs of millions of human beings and even cooperate in their destruction.

 
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