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Daily Catholic Question

When did kneelers come into common use in churches?

When asked your question, liturgist Thomas Richstatter, O.F.M., replied, "I would refer you to The Postures of the Assembly During the Eucharistic Prayer, by John K. Leonard and Nathan D. Mitchell (Liturgy Training Publications), regarding the practice of kneeling at prayer.

"Regarding kneelers as furniture, I would presume they were relatively late. Originally there were no pieces of furniture for the 'circumstantes' (those standing about), simply a chair for the president. As a concession to the infirm, stone seats began to be attached to pillars, or to the walls. By the end of the 13th century many churches in England appear to have some wooden benches—often called pews.

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Saturday, February 16, 2013
Daily Catholic Question for 2/15/2013 Daily Catholic Question for 2/17/2013


Marcellinus and Peter: Marcellinus and Peter were prominent enough in the memory of the Church to be included among the saints of the Roman Canon. Mention of their names is optional in our present Eucharistic Prayer I. 
<p>Marcellinus was a priest and Peter was an exorcist, that is, someone authorized by the Churh to deal with cases of demonic possession. They were beheaded during the persecution of Emperor Diocletian. Pope Damasus wrote an epitaph apparently based on the report of their executioner, and Constantine erected a basilica over the crypt in which they were buried in Rome. Numerous legends sprang from an early account of their death.</p> American Catholic Blog Faith can help us accept that the one who has died is now joined with all those who were part of his or her life, those whom they have loved and who have gone before them. We believe that they are now with God in a fuller way than was possible during their life on earth.

Walk Softly and Carry a Great Bag

 
CATHOLIC GREETINGS
Lent
Lent invites us to open our hearts, minds and bodies to the grace of rebirth.

Lent
Together we join our small sacrifices to Jesus’ complete and perfect one.

St. Valentine
Catholic Greetings helps you remind others that God is the source of all human love.

Ash Wednesday
Throughout these 40 days we allow our pride to fade into humility as together we ask for forgiveness.

Mardi Gras
Promise this Lent to do one thing to become more aware of God in yourself and in others.




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