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Daily Catholic Question

Are Catholics exempt from jury duty?

Jesus tells us not to judge others. Does this mean that we should avoid jury duty or working as judges?

Jesus' words are meant to remind us that we cannot know what other people are thinking and feeling. In fact, we cannot even know what people are doing, as appearances are often deceiving. God is the ultimate judge of us all.

That does not mean we have no duty to help maintain order, justice, and peace in society. If all Christians were to abandon roles in law enforcement and the judicial system, the result would be disastrous.

Catholics should take all their civic duties—including jury duty—seriously.

Click here for the rest of today's answer

Monday, February 10, 2014
Daily Catholic Question for 2/9/2014 Daily Catholic Question for 2/11/2014


All Saints: The earliest certain observance of a feast in honor of all the saints is an early fourth-century commemoration of "all the martyrs." In the early seventh century, after successive waves of invaders plundered the catacombs, Pope Boniface IV gathered up some 28 wagonloads of bones and reinterred them beneath the Pantheon, a Roman temple dedicated to all the gods. The pope rededicated the shrine as a Christian church. According to Venerable Bede, the pope intended "that the memory of all the saints might in the future be honored in the place which had formerly been dedicated to the worship not of gods but of demons" (<i>On the Calculation of Time</i>). 
<p>But the rededication of the Pantheon, like the earlier commemoration of all the martyrs, occurred in May. Many Eastern Churches still honor all the saints in the spring, either during the Easter season or immediately after Pentecost. </p><p>How the Western Church came to celebrate this feast, now recognized as a solemnity, in November is a puzzle to historians. The Anglo-Saxon theologian Alcuin observed the feast on November 1 in 800, as did his friend Arno, Bishop of Salzburg. Rome finally adopted that date in the ninth century.</p> American Catholic Blog Touch can be an act of kindness when someone is dying. If you visit a sick person and find that you are at a loss for words, reach out and touch her hand.

 
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CATHOLIC GREETINGS
Birthday
Send a wish that each tomorrow of the coming year will be full of life and peace!
World Marriage Day
Today's celebration honors the lifelong commitment of husbands and wives.
St. Josephine Bakhita
Today we honor the first saint from the Sudan, a model of piety and humility.
National Marriage Week
During this week especially tell each other how much your marriage means to you.
St. Valentine's Day
Schedule one or more e-cards today to be delivered next Friday.



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